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Projects


Project "Self-involvement and cardiovascular reactivity"

Funded by a grant from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Ge 987/3-1) awarded to Guido H.E. Gendolla.
Research staff: Michael Richter.

Experiments investigating the impact of self-involvement and task difficulty on effort mobilization. Effort mobilization is assessed as autonomic reactivity (cardiovascular, electrodermal), expecially systolic blood pressure.

Selected publications:
Gendolla, G.H.E., Wright, R.A., & Richter, M. (in press). Effort intensity: Studies of cardiovascular response. In R. Ryan (Ed.), The Oxford handbook on motivation. New York: Oxford University Press.

Gendolla, G.H.E., & Richter, M. (2010). Effort mobilization when the self is involved: Some lessons from the cardiovascular system. Review of General Psychology, 14, 212-226. doi:10.1037/a0019742
   Link to the article.

Gendolla, G.H.E., Richter, M., & Brinkmann, K. (2009). The role of self-involvement in the development of cardiovascular disease: A motivational analysis. In L. Sher (Ed.), Psychological factors and cardiovascular disorders: The role of stress and psychosocial influences (pp. 181-193). New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Gendolla, G.H.E, Richter, M., & Silvia, P. (2008). Self-focus and task difficulty effects on effort-related cardiovascular reactivity. Psychophysiology, 45, 653-662.

Gendolla, G.H.E., & Richter, M. (2006). Cardiovascular reactivity during performance under social observation: The moderating role of task difficulty. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 62, 185-192.

Gendolla, G.H.E., & Richter, M. (2006). Ego-Involvement and the difficulty law of motivation: Effects on performance-related cardiovascular response. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 32, 1188-1203.

Gendolla, G.H.E., & Richter, M. (2005). Ego-involvement and mental effort: Cardiovascular, electrodermal, and performance effects. Psychophysiology, 42, 595-603.

Gendolla, G.H.E. & Wright, R.A. (2005). Motivation in social settings: studies of effort-related cardiovascular arousal. In J.P. Forgas, K. Williams & W. von Hippel, (Eds.), Social Motivation (pp. 71-90). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Gendolla, G.H.E. (2004). The intensity of motivation when the self is involved: An application of Brehm’s energization theory to effort-related cardiovascular response. In R.A. Wright, J. Greenberg, & S.S. Brehm (Eds.), Motivation and emotion in social contexts (pp. 204-225). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.


Project "Mood effects"

Funded by a grant from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Ge 987/7-1) awarded to Guido H.E. Gendolla

Experiments investigating the role of mood states in self-perception, e.g. the experience of physical symptoms, and cognitive processes that influence the intensity of mood states, e.g. expectations about the hedonic quality of future events.

Selected publications:
Gendolla, G.H.E., Wright, R.A., & Richter, M. (in press). Effort intensity: Studies of cardiovascular response. In R. Ryan (Ed.), The Oxford handbook on motivation. New York: Oxford University Press.

Von Helversen, B., Gendolla, G.H.E., Winkielman, P., & Schmidt, R. (2008). Under the hood of cognitive feelings: How does subjective processing ease relate to objective effort? Motivation and Emotion, 32, 1-10.

Brinkmann, K., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2008). Does depression interfere with effort mobilization? Effects of dysphoria and task difficulty on cardiovascular response. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94, 146-157.

Brinkmann, K., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2007). Dysphoria and mobilization of mental effort: Effects on cardiovascular reactivity. Motivation and Emotion, 31, 71-82.

Gendolla, G.H.E., Brinkmann, K., & Richter, M. (2007). Mood, motivation, and performance: An integrative theory, research, and applications. In A. M. Lane (Ed.), Mood and human performance: Conceptual, measurement, and applied issues (pp. 35-61). Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science.

Richter, M., Gendolla, G.H.E., & Krüsken, J. (2006). Context-dependent mood effects on mental effort mobilization: A view from the Mood-Behavior-Model. In A.V. Clark (Ed.). The psychology of moods (pp. 57-79). Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

Schubö, A., Gendolla, G.H.E, Meinecke, C., & Abele, A.E. (2006). Detecting emotional faces and features in a visual search paradigm: Are faces special? Emotion, 6, 246-256.

Gendolla, G.H.E., Abele, A.E., Andrei, A., Spurk, D. & Richter, M. (2005). Negative mood, self-focused attention, and the experience of physical symptoms: The joint impact hypothesis. Emotion, 5, 131-144.

Gendolla, G.H.E., & Richter, M. (2005). The role of mood states in the development of cardiovascular disease: Implications of a motivational analysis of cardiovascular reactivity in active coping. In P. Sohov (Ed.), Advances in psychology research (Vol. 33, pp. 139-157). Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers.


Project "Mood and mental effort"

Funded by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (100011-108144) awarded to Guido H.E. Gendolla
Research staff: Joana I. de Burgo de Lima Ramos and Nicolas Silvestrini

Experiments investigating the impact of mood states on the mobilization of mental resources. Effort mobilization is quantified as cardiovascular reactivity during task performance.

Selected publications:
Gendolla, G.H.E., Brinkmann, K., & Silvestrini, N. (2012). Gloomy and lazy? On the impact of mood and depressive symptoms on effort-related cardiovascular response. In R.A. Wright & G.H.E. Gendolla (Eds.), How motivation affects cardiovascular response: Mechanisms and applications (pp. 139-155). Washington, DC: APA Press.

Gendolla, G.H.E., Wright, R.A., & Richter, M. (2012). Effort intensity: Some insights from the cardiovascular system. In R.M. Ryan (Ed.), The Oxford handbook on motivation (pp. 420-438). New York: Oxford University Press.

Silvestrini, N., & Gendolla, G. H. E. (2011). Beta-adrenergic impact underlies the effect of mood and hedonic instrumentality on effort-related cardiovascular response. Biological Psychology, 87, 209- 217. doi:10.1016/j.biopsycho .2011.02.017

Silvestrini, N., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2010). L’humeur, l’affect implicite et la mobilisation de l’effort mental. . In S. Masmoudi & A. Naceur (Eds.), Du percept à la décision: Intégration de la cognition, l'émotion et la motivation (pp. 140-156). Bruxelles, Belgium : De Boeck.

De Burgo, J., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2009). Are moods motivational states? A study on effort-related cardiovascular response. Emotion, 9, 892-697.

Silvestrini, N., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2009). Mood-regulative hedonic incentive interacts with mood and task difficulty to determine effort-related cardiovascular response and facial EMG. Biological Psychology, 82, 54-63.

Silvestrini, N., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2009). The joint effect of mood, task valence, and task difficulty on effort-related cardiovascular response and facial EMG. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 73, 226-234.

Silvestrini, N., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2007). Mood state effects on autonomic activity in mood regulation. Psychophysiology, 44, 650-659.

Gendolla, G.H.E., & Brinkmann, K. (2005). The role of mood states in self-regulation: Effects on action preferences and resource mobilization. European Psychologist, 10, 187-198.


Project "Appraisal and motivational processes in the elicitation of emotion"

Funded by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation awarded to Klaus R. Scherer and Guido H.E. Gendolla as part of the national research pole "Affective sciences : Emotion and individual behavior and social processes" (project 1).
Research staff: Sylvia D. Kreibig.

Experiments on the linkage between appraisal processes and emotional and motivational outcomes during task performance.

Selected publications:
Kreibig, S. D., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2014). Autonomic nervous system measurement of emotion in education and achievement settings. In R. Pekrun, & L. Linnenbrink-Garcia (Eds.), International handbook of emotions in education (pp. 625-642). New York, NY: Routledge.

Kreibig, S. D., Gendolla, G.H.E., & Scherer, K. R. (2012). Goal relevance and goal conduciveness appraisals lead to differential autonomic reactivity in emotional responding to performance feedback. Biological Psychology, 91, 365-375. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.08.007

Kreibig, S. D. (2010). Autonomic nervous system activity in emotion: A review. Biological Psychology, 84, 394–421.

Kreibig, S. D., Gendolla, G. H. E., & Scherer, K. R. (2010). Psychophysiological effects of emotional responding to goal attainment. Biological Psychology, 84, 474-487.


Project "Demand salience, importance salience, and effort mobilization"

Funded by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (100014_118220) awarded to Michael Richter.

Selected publications:
Gendolla, G.H.E., Wright, R.A., & Richter, M. (2012). Effort intensity: Some insights from the cardiovascular system. In R.M. Ryan (Ed.), The Oxford handbook on motivation (pp. 420-438). New York: Oxford University Press.

Richter, M., & Knappe, K. (2014). Mood impact on effort-related cardiovascular reactivity depends on task context: Evidence from a task with an unfixed performance standard. International Journal of Psychophysiology. doi:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2014.05.002
   Link to the article.

Richter, M. (2010). Pay attention to your manipulation checks! Reward impact on cardiac reactivity is moderated by task context. Biological Psychology, 84, 279-289. doi:10.1016/j.biopsycho.2010.02.014. Link to the article.

Richter, M. (2008). Cardiac reactivity in active coping: The moderating role of task context. Psychophysiology [Supplement], 45, S96.


Project "Primed affect and cardiovascular response"

Funded by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (100014-122604, 100014-131760) awarded to Guido H.E. Gendolla.
Research staff: Laure Freydefont, Ruta Lasauskaite, and Nicolas Silvestrini

Experiments investigating the role of unconsciously processed affective stimuli on effort-related cardiovascular reactivity in the context of cognitive tasks.

Selected publications:
Lasauskaite, R., Gendolla, G.H.E., Bolmont, M., & Freydefont, L. (2017). Implicit happiness and sadness are associated with ease and difficulty: Evidence from sequential priming. Psychological Research, 81, 321-331. doi: 10.1007/s00426-015-0732-3

Lasauskaite Schüppbach, R., Gendolla, G.H.E., & Silvestrini, N. (2014). Contrasting the effects of sub optimally versus optimally presented affect primes on effort-related cardiac response. Motivation and Emotion, 38, 748-758. doi:10.1007/s11031-014-9438-x

Lasauskaite, R., Gendolla, G.H.E., & Silvestrini, N. (2013). Do sadness-primes make me work harder because they make me sad? Cognition and Emotion, 27, 158-165. doi: 10.1080/02699931.2012.689756

Freydefont, L., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2012). Incentive moderates the impact of implicit anger versus sadness cues on effort-related cardiac response. Biological Psychology, 91, 120-127. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.04.002

Freydefont, L., Gendolla, G.H.E., & Silvestrini, N. (2012). Beyond valence: The differential effect of masked anger and sadness stimuli on effort-related cardiac response. Psychophysiology, 49, 665-671. doi:10.1111/j.1469-8986.2011.01340.x

Silvestrini, N., & Gendolla, G. H. E. (2011). Masked affective stimuli moderate task difficulty effects on effort-related cardiovascular response. Psychophysiology, 48, 1157-1164. doi:10.1111/j.1469-8986.2011.01181.x

Gendolla, G.H.E., & Silvestrini, N. (2011). Smiles make it easier and so do frowns: Masked affective stimuli influence mental effort. Emotion, 11, 320-328. doi: 10.1037/a0022593

Silvestrini, N., & Gendolla, G. H. E. (2011). Do not prime too much: Prime frequency effects of masked affective stimuli on effort-related cardiovascular response. Biological Psychology, 87, 195-199. doi:10.1016/j.biopsycho.2011.01.006

Gendolla, G.H.E., & Silvestrini, N. (2010). The implicit “Go”: Masked action cues directly mobilize mental effort. Psychological Science, 21, 1389-1393.

Silvestrini, N., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2010). L’humeur, l’affect implicite et la mobilisation de l’effort mental. In S. Masmoudi & A. Naceur (Eds.), Du percept à la décision: Intégration de la cognition, l'émotion et la motivation (pp. 140-156). Bruxelles, Belgium : De Boeck.


Project "Determinants of energization in a physical task paradigm: The Ketchup task"

Funded by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (100014_134586) awarded to Michael Richter.

Selected publications:
Stanek, J., & Richter, M. (2016). Evidence Against the Primacy of Energy Conservation: Exerted Force in Possible and Impossible Handgrip Tasks. Motivation Science, 2, 49–65. doi: 10.1037/mot0000028

Richter, M., & Stanek, J. (2015). The muscle metaphor in self-regulation in the light of current theorizing on muscle physiology. In G. H. E. Gendolla, M. Tops, & S. L. Koole (Eds.), Handbook of biobehavioral approaches to self-regulation (pp.55-68). New York, NY: Springer.
   Link to the chapter.

Richter, M. (2015). Goal pursuit and energy conservation: Energy investment increases with task demand but does not equal it. Motivation and Emotion, 39, 25-33. doi:10.1007/s11031-014-9429-y
   Link to the article.

Richter, M. (2013). A closer look into the multi-layer structure of motivational intensity theory. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 7, 1-12. doi:10.1111/spc3.12007
   Link to the article.

Richter, M. (2012). Energy investment in an isometric hand grip task: Evidence for the energy conservation principle. In A. Bröder, E. Erdfelder, B. E. Hilbig, T. Meiser, R. F. Phol & D. Stahlberg (Eds.), Abstracts of the 54. Tagung experimentell arbeitender Psychologen: TeaP 2012 [Abstracts of the 54th Meeting of experimental psychologists: TeaP 2012] (p. 217). Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers.

Richter, M. (2012). Task difficulty effects on exerted force in an isometric hand-grip task: Mixed evidence for energy conservation. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 85, 304. doi:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2012.06.043


Project "Effort-related cardiovascular reactivity to hedonic consequences in depression"

Funded by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (100014_134557) awarded to Kerstin Brinkmann.

Selected publications:
Franzen, J., Brinkmann, K., Gendolla, G. H. E., & Sentissi, O. (2018). Major depression impairs incentive processing: Evidence from the heart and the face. Psychological Medicine. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1017/S0033291718001526

Brinkmann, K., & Franzen, J. (2017). Blunted cardiovascular reactivity during social reward anticipation in subclinical depression. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 119, 119-126. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2017.01.010

Franzen, J., & Brinkmann, K. (2016). Wanting and liking in dysphoria: Cardiovascular and facial EMG responses during incentive processing. Biological Psychology, 121, 19-29. doi:10.1016/j.biopsycho.2016.07.018

Franzen, J., & Brinkmann, K. (2016). Anhedonic symptoms of depression are linked to reduced motivation to obtain a reward. Motivation and Emotion, 40. 300-308. doi:10.1007/s11031-015-9529-3

Franzen, J., & Brinkmann, K. (2015). Blunted cardiovascular reactivity in dysphoria during reward and punishment anticipation. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 95, 270-277. doi:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2014.11.007

Brinkmann, K., Franzen, J., Rossier, C., & Gendolla (2014). I don't care about others' approval: Dysphoric individuals show reduced effort mobilization for obtaining a social reward. Motivation and Emotion, 38, 790-801. doi:10.1007/s11031-014-9437-y

Brinkmann, K., & Franzen, J. (2013). Not everyone’s heart contracts to reward: Insensitivity to varying levels of reward in dysphoria. Biological Psychology, 94, 263-271. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2013.07.003


Project "Primed effort in cognitive tasks: Effects on cardiovascular response"

Funded by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (100014-140251) awarded to Guido H.E. Gendolla.
Research staff: Nicolas Silvestrini, Mathieu Chatelain, Athina Zafeiriou

Experiments investigating the role of implicit affective and implicit stereotypic influences on effort-related cardiovascular reactivity in the context of cognitive tasks.

Selected publications:
Zafeiriou, A., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2018). Implicit aging: Masked age primes influence effort-related cardiovascular response in young adults. Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology, 4, 1-20. doi: 10.1007/s40750-017-0074-z

Zafeiriou, A., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2017). Implicit activation of the aging stereotype influences effort-related cardiovascular response: The role of incentive. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 119,79-86. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2017.01.011

Chatelain, M., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2016). Monetary incentive moderates the effect of implicit fear on effort-related cardiovascular response. Biological Psychology, 117, 150-158. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2016.03.014

Richter, M., Gendolla, G.H.E., & Wright, R.A. (2016). Three decades of research on motivational intensity theory: What we have learned about effort and what we still don't know. Advances in Motivation Science, 3, 149-186. doi: 10.1016/bs.adms.2016.02.001

Chatelain, M., Silvestrini, N., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2016). Task difficulty moderates implicit fear and anger effects on effort-related cardiac response. Biological Psychology, 115, 94-100. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2016.01.014

Chatelain, M., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2015). Implicit fear and effort-related cardiac response. Biological Psychology, 111, 73-82. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2015.08.009

Gendolla, G.H.E. (2015). Implicit affect primes effort: Basic processes, moderators, and boundary conditions. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 606-619. doi: 10.1111/spc3.12208

Gendolla, G.H.E, Tops, M., & Koole, S. (Eds.) (2015). Handbook of biobehavioral approaches to self-regulation. New York, NY: Springer.

Gendolla, G.H.E., & Silvestrini, N. (2015). Bounded effort automaticity: A drama in four parts. In G.H.E. Gendolla, M. Tops, & S. Koole. (Eds.), Handbook of biobehavioral approaches to self-regulation (pp. 271-286). New York, NY: Springer.

Gendolla, G.H.E., Tops, M., & Koole, S.L. (2015). Introduction: Grounding self-regulation in the brain and body. In G.H.E. Gendolla, M. Tops, & S. Koole. (Eds.), Handbook of biobehavioral approaches to self-regulation (pp. 1-6). New York, NY: Springer.

Silvestrini, N., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2013). Automatic effort mobilization and the principle of resource conservation: One can only prime the possible and justified. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104, 803-816 doi: 10.1037/a0031995

Gendolla, G.H.E. (2012). Implicit affect primes effort: Theory and research on cardiovascular response.International Journal of Psychophysiology, 86, 123-135. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2012.05.003


Project "Motivational Perspectives on the Reciprocal Influence of Cognitive Control and Pain"

Funded by an Ambizione grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (PZ00P1_142458/1) awarded to Nicolas Silvestrini.

Selected publications:
Silvestrini, N., Gendolla, G.H.E. (2019). Affect and cognitive control: Insights from research on effort mobilization. International Journal of Psychophysiology. (Special issue on “What is Cognitive Control Without Affect?”), 143, 116-125. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2019.07.003

Silvestrini, N., Vuignier, E., Matthey, A., & Piguet, V. (2019). The perception of available resources influences the after-effect of cognitive control on cognitive performance and pain. Social Psychology, 50, 332-344. doi: 10.1027/1864-9335/a000386

Silvestrini, N. (2018). On the implicit influence of pain cues on cognitive effort: Evidence from cardiovascular reactivity. Biological Psychology, 132, 45-54. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2017.11.002

Silvestrini, N. (2017). Psychological and neural mechanisms associated with effort-related cardiovascular reactivity and cognitive control: An integrative approach. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 119, 11-18. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2016.12.009

Silvestrini, N. (2015). The effort-related cost of implicit pain. Motivation Science, 1(3), 151-164. doi: 10.1037/mot0000020


Project "The impact of the achievement motive on effort mobilization"

Funded by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (100019_162389) awarded to Kerstin Brinkmann and Michael Richter.
Research staff: Florence Mazeres


Project "Boundary conditions of effort priming: Effects on cardiac response"

Funded by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (100014_162399) awarded to Guido H.E. Gendolla.
Research staff: David Framorando

Experiments investigating moderating variables and boundary conditions of automaticity in effort mobilization. Of special interest are the different effects of implicitly vs. explicitly processed affective stimuli on effort-related cardiovascular reactivity in the context of cognitive tasks.

Selected publications:
Gendolla, G.H.E., Wright, R.A., & Richter, M. (2019). Advancing issues in motivation intensity research: Updated insights from the cardiovascular system. In R.M. Ryan (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of human motivation (2nd ed., pp. 373-392). New York: Oxford University Press.

Framorando, D., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2019). It’s about effort: Implicit affect’s impact on cardiovascular response is context-dependent. Psychophysiology, 11: e13436. doi: 10.1111/psyp.13436

Silvestrini, N., Gendolla, G.H.E. (2019). Affect and cognitive control: Insights from research on effort mobilization. International Journal of Psychophysiology. (Special issue on “What is Cognitive Control Without Affect?”), 143, 116-125. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2019.07.003

Framorando, D., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2019). Prime warning moderates implicit affect primes’ effect on effort-related cardiac response in men. Biological Psychology, 142, 62-69. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.013

Framorando, D., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2018). The effect of negative implicit affect, prime visibility, and gender on effort-related cardiac response. Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology, 4, 354-363. doi: 10.1007/s40750-018-0097-0

Framorando, D., & Gendolla, G.H.E. (2018). Prime visibility moderates implicit anger and sadness effects on effort-related cardiac response. Biological Psychology, 135, 204-210. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.04.007

Gendolla, G.H.E. (2018). Implicit affect and the intensity of motivation: From simple effects to moderators. Polish Psychological Bulletin (Special issue on perception and motivation), 49, 56-65. doi: 10.24425/119472

Gendolla, G.H.E., Wright, R.A., & Richter, M. (in press). Advancing issues in motivation intensity research: Updated insights from the cardiovascular system. In R.M. Ryan (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of human motivation (2nd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Gendolla, G.H.E. (in press). Effort mobilization in self-regulation: The impact of experienced and implicit affect. In J. Shaw (Ed.), Self-regulation: Context, capacity, and challenge. New York, NY: Psychology Press.


Project "Pain and cognitive control: The impact of working memory, time dynamics, and effort"

Funded by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (100014_175965) awarded to Nicolas Silvestrini.
Research staff: Tamara Cancela


Project "Affective influences on goal pursuit: The moderating role of deliberation"

Funded by a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (100014_185348) awarded to Guido H.E. Gendolla.
Research staff: Johanna Falk

Experiments testing whether task choice moderates the influences of mood states, implicit affect, distracting noise, and depressive symptoms on effort mobilization and persistence.