Teaching

Lukas Erne

 

Autumn Semester 2016

 

Introduction to the Study of Literature (1st-year lecture course, autumn 2016: Lukas Erne; spring 2017: Deborah Madsen)

Tuesdays, 10-12, Room B111

This course is designed to introduce students to the terminology and skills required for the study of literature at the university level. It is organised into four half-semesters, each of which is devoted to the study of a genre: poetry and drama (taught by Professor Erne in the autumn semester) and fiction and nonfiction prose (taught by Professor Madsen in the spring semester). Among the texts we will study are Shakespeare's Hamlet, Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, as well as a range of poems from the sixteenth century to the present. Students are encouraged to read Hamlet over the summer.

Bibliography: It is important that students buy the following editions (copies are available from Payot):

William Shakespeare, Hamlet, eds. Barbara Mowat and Paul Werstine. Folger Shakespeare Library. Washington DC: Washington Square Press, updated edition 2012. ISBN 978-1-4516-6941-1

Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, ed. Brian Harding. Oxford World's Classics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. ISBN 978-0-19-953780-8.

 

An Introduction to English Literature, 1500-1800 (BA 5 lecture course, with Dr Elizabeth Kukorelly)

Tuesdays, 16-18, Room B104

This compulsory lecture course, taught in the autumn and the spring semester, provides an introduction to English literature written in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Students are strongly encouraged to attend it before, or at least at the same time as, but not after the seminars devoted to the period covered by module BA5. Indeed, one of the aims of this lecture course is to equip students with the knowledge of literary history upon which BA5 seminars rely. The lecture course is divided into two parts, the first devoted to the Renaissance (ca. 1500-1660), the second to the Restoration and the eighteenth century. Among the historical and intellectual developments that will be addressed in the first part are Humanism and the Reformation, early modern poetry (both lyric and epic), early modern drama, and English Renaissance literary theory. The second part will examine Restoration and eighteenth-century drama, the poetry of the Augustan or neo-classical period, the periodical essay and literary theory, satire and sensibility, and the development of prose fiction towards what is commonly known as "the novel".

Course book: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 9th ed. (2012), vol. 1 (Middle Ages Through the Restoration and the Eighteenth Century), ISBN 978-0-393-91247-0. It is important that you order the 9th edition, and that you order it well BEFORE the beginning of the semester.

 

MA seminar: Versions of Shakespeare

Wednesdays, 10-12, Room A210

A number of Shakespeare's most famous plays exist in two or, in the case of Hamlet, even in three different versions. The difference between these versions and the particularities of each version provide privileged access to an advanced understanding of Shakespeare, the dramatic author, as well as of the theatrical enterprise of which he was a member. We will study the different versions of several plays, in particular Romeo and Juliet, Henry V, and Hamlet. By week 3 at the latest, all students are expected to know these three plays, so you are advised to start reading before the beginning of the semester unless you are already familiar with the texts.

Textbooks:
Romeo and Juliet, ed. G. Blakemore Evans, The New Cambridge Shakespeare, updated edition (2003), ISBN 978-0521532532
King Henry V, ed. Andrew Gurr, The New Cambridge Shakespeare, updated edition (2005), ISBN: 978-0521612647
Hamlet, ed. Philip Edwards, The New Cambridge Shakespeare, updated edition (2003), ISBN: 978-0521532525
Other material will be made available on Chamilo (https://chamilo.unige.ch).

 

Doctoral Workshop: Medieval and Early Modern English Studies (with Prof. Guillemette Bolens)

Wednesdays, 16-19 (fortnightly), Room A210

Open to Geneva doctoral and post-doctoral students.

See http://unige.ch/lettres/angle/en/etudes/medemod/.

The Geneva Doctoral Workshop in Medieval and Early Modern English Studies has been meeting on a fortnightly basis since the academic year 2007-2008. It is convened by Professor Guillemette Bolens and Professor Lukas Erne, and attended by English Department PhD students, post-docs, and staff in medieval and early modern, including from the other CUSO universities, the Universities of Berne, Fribourg, Lausanne and Neuchâtel. Workshops variously address practical issues relevant to PhD students (e.g., doing research towards a doctoral dissertation, digital resources, presenting a paper at a conference, getting into print, reviewing one’s first book), offer opportunities for the presentation of work-in-progress papers, or are devoted to special topics in medieval and early modern English studies and taught by guests from Switzerland and abroad. Scholars who have led workshops in the past include Irena Backus (University of Geneva), Ladina Bezzola (University of Basel), Margaret Bridges (University of Berne), Brian Cummings (University of Sussex), Rachel Falconer (University of Lausanne), Alan Fletcher (University College, Dublin), Neil Forsyth (University of Lausanne), Robert Miola (Loyola University Maryland), Helen Moore (University of Oxford), Anthony Mortimer (University of Fribourg), Scott Newstok (Rhodes College), Stephen Orgel (Stanford University), Denis Renevey (University of Lausanne), Mauro Spicci (University of Milan), Kirsten Stirling (University of Lausanne), Daniel Wakelin (University of Oxford), Greg Walker (University of Edinburgh), and Richard Waswo (University of Geneva).

 


Spring Semester 2017

 

BA seminar: Drama at the Court of Henry VIII (with Dr Devani Singh)

Tuesdays, 10-12, Room B307

The drama written during the reign of King Henry VIII vividly reflects the anxieties of its age. In this seminar, we will closely study some of the dramatic interludes (short plays) produced against the backdrop of the Henrician court: John Heywood's 'The Four PP' and 'The Play of the Weather'; Heywood and John Rastell's 'Gentleness and Nobility'; John Skelton's 'Magnyfycence'; and the anonymous 'Godly Queen Hester'. The seminar will consider the literary innovation of these texts and their significance in relation to the larger landscape of English drama. We will also discuss how these works use the medium of dramatic performance to respond to the religious and political crises of their time.

Texts: the course material will be made available on Chamilo (https://chamilo.unige.ch).

 

An Introduction to English Literature, 1500-1800 (BA5 lecture course, with Dr Elizabeth Kukorelly)

Wednesdays, 14-16, Room B104

This compulsory lecture course, taught in the autumn and the spring semester, provides an introduction to English literature written in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Students are strongly encouraged to attend it before, or at least at the same time as, but not after the seminars devoted to the period covered by module BA5. Indeed, one of the aims of this lecture course is to equip students with the knowledge of literary history upon which BA5 seminars rely. The lecture course is divided into two parts, the first devoted to the Renaissance (ca. 1500-1660), the second to the Restoration and the eighteenth century. Among the historical and intellectual developments that will be addressed in the first part are Humanism and the Reformation, early modern poetry (both lyric and epic), early modern drama, and English Renaissance literary theory. The second part will examine Restoration and eighteenth-century drama, the poetry of the Augustan or neo-classical period, the periodical essay and literary theory, satire and sensibility, and the development of prose fiction towards what is commonly known as "the novel".

Course book: for BOTH parts, “The Norton Anthology of English Literature”, 9th ed. (2012), vol. 1 (Middle Ages Through the Restoration and the Eighteenth Century), ISBN 978-0-393-91247-0. It is important that you order the 9th edition, and that you order it well BEFORE the beginning of the semester.

 

MA seminar: Early Modern English Literature and the Material Text

Wednesdays, 10-12, Room A210

This seminar proposes to study early modern English literature in the context of the material text and, more generally, the early modern book trade. While we will pay attention to some of the leading early modern English writers such as Shakespeare, Marlowe, Spenser, and Milton, our aim will not be to study their texts in their own right, but to do so from a book-historical perspective. Topics we will devote attention to include paratext, the bibliographical construction of authorship, kinds of early modern books, and the workings of the early modern book trade. We will also be interested in how the mass of forgotten or little-remembered writers and texts relate to and can throw light on the masterpieces which have made it to the top of the literary canon. You will be asked to familiarize yourself with some of the exciting research tools modern scholarship puts at our disposal, including EEBO (Early English Books Online), LION (Literature Online), and the ESTC (English Short-Title Catalogue). Equipped with the necessary knowledge to handle these research tools, you will be assigned (or partly choose yourself) specific individual assignments that will allow you to do original research on aspects of early modern English literature.

Texts: the course material will be made available on Chamilo (https://chamilo.unige.ch).

 

Doctoral Workshop: Medieval and Early Modern English Studies (with Prof. Guillemette Bolens)

Wednesdays, 16-19 (fortnightly), Room A210

Open to Geneva doctoral and post-doctoral students.

See http://unige.ch/lettres/angle/en/etudes/medemod/.

The Geneva Doctoral Workshop in Medieval and Early Modern English Studies has been meeting on a fortnightly basis since the academic year 2007-2008. It is convened by Professor Guillemette Bolens (replaced by Dr. Lucy Perry during her term as vice-rector of the University of Geneva) and Professor Lukas Erne, and attended by English Department PhD students, post-docs, and staff in medieval and early modern, including from the other Triangle Azur universities, the University of Lausanne and the University of Neuchâtel. Workshops variously address practical issues relevant to PhD students (e.g., doing research towards a doctoral dissertation, digital resources, presenting a paper at a conference, getting into print, reviewing one’s first book), offer opportunities for the presentation of work-in-progress papers, or are devoted to special topics in medieval and early modern English studies and taught by guests from Switzerland and abroad. Scholars who have led workshops in the past include Irena Backus (University of Geneva), Ladina Bezzola (University of Basel), Margaret Bridges (University of Berne), Brian Cummings (University of Sussex), Rachel Falconer (University of Lausanne), Alan Fletcher (University College, Dublin), Neil Forsyth (University of Lausanne), Robert Miola (Loyola University Maryland), Helen Moore (University of Oxford), Anthony Mortimer (University of Fribourg), Scott Newstok (Rhodes College), Stephen Orgel (Stanford University), Denis Renevey (University of Lausanne), Mauro Spicci (University of Milan), Kirsten Stirling (University of Lausanne), Daniel Wakelin (University of Oxford), Greg Walker (University of Edinburgh), and Richard Waswo (University of Geneva).

 

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