Atelier Doctoral en Anglais Médiéval et Moderne

Schedule

AUTUMN 2017

Wednesdays, 4.15-6.45 p.m., Room, A 210, Uni Bastions, Aile Jura

 

27 September., Collaborative Close Reading: Six Noble Kinsmen

This workshop will be an exercise in collaborative close reading. We will look at three versions of the moment at which Palamon and Arcite both fall in love with Emilia—from Boccaccio’s Il Teseida, Chaucer’s The Knight’s Tale, and Shakespeare and Fletcher’s Two Noble Kinsmen. Our discussion will explore the differences between the three versions in the hope of coming to a better understanding of the choices made by each writer.

11 October, work-in-progress papers: Ms Amy Brown (UNIGE), Mr Azamat Rakhimov (UNIGE) and Dr Olivia Robinson (UNIFR)

13-14 October, CUSO doctoral programme, ‘Scholarly Editing’, UNIFR

25 October, Prof. M.J. Kidnie (University of Western Ontario), ‘Performance and Adaptation’

Further information to follow.

Prof. Kidnie will also give a lecture at 10.15 a.m., in room A210, title tba

15 November, work-in-progress papers: Dr Ruth Mullett (UNIGE), Ms Laura Pereira Domínguez (Univ. Santiago de Compostella) & Mr Killian Schindler (UNIFR)

18 November, CUSO doctoral programme, ‘Literature & Knowledge in Early Modern England’, UNIL

29 Nov.,workshop led by Dr Antoinina Bevan-Zlatar (UNIZH) on ‘Milton’s Images

This workshop explores Milton’s use of what George Puttenham calls ‘hypotyposis, or counterfeit representation’ and ‘omiosis, or resemblance’ (simile), particularly in his descriptions of Adam and Eve in the Edenic books of Paradise Lost. To what degree are Adam and Eve both made in the image of God? How do their differences manifest themselves in the descriptions or types of similes deployed?  Is there a tension in these books between the classical valorisation of sight as the pre-eminent sense and the Reformation suspicion of sight as the devil’s door? Can Adam be accused of idolising Eve?

1 December, CUSO doctoral programme, ‘PhD Day: Writing and Job Interviews’, UNIL

13 December, workshop led by Dr Nicole Nyffenegger (UNIBE), ‘The Textuality of Human Skin’

This workshop focuses on the textuality of human skin in medieval and early modern literature and in particular on the ways in which skin marked by wounds invites conceptualisations as a mise-en-abyme page. Starting from the medieval Charter of Christ tradition, we will discuss wounds as inscriptions in medieval crucifixion lyrics and in Shakespeare’s Coriolanus. We will pay particular attention to the pain of the wounded as perpetuated by the reading practices applied to the thus inscribed skin, both by intra-and extratexual audiences.

 

Spring 2017

Wednesdays, 4.15-6.45 p.m., Room, A 210, Uni Bastions, Aile Jura

 

1 March, jointly-led ‘Bring a Text / Present a Problem’ workshop

Each participant brings a short text and/or problem they have encountered in their research and has ten minutes to present it to or share it with the group. The text and/or problem can be of any kind, literary, critical, bibliographical, methodological, etc. The only requirements are that it/they be related to research and can be profitably shared with the group in ca. 10 minutes.

15 March, workshop led by Dr Mary Flannery (UNIL) on ‘The Canterbury Tales​​ and Chaucer’s Obscene Legacy’

Chaucer’s literary legacy plays a crucial role in determining what is culturally and even legallypermissible in present-day language and art. This workshop makes a case for a new project that investigates the foundations of Chaucer’s current status as an icon of literary fame and of obscenity (or acceptability) by examining the impact of obscenity on the transmission of The Canterbury Tales and on Chaucer’s shifting reputation from age to age.

29 March, workshop led by Prof. Alan Fletcher (University College Dublin) on ‘Continuities and Beginnings: Theatrical Art in the Long Tudor Century

This workshop proposes that we must revisit some of scholarly narratives about the nature of drama in Britain and Ireland during the long Tudor century. It will proceed on a clockwise tour of Britain and Ireland and examine some of the local dramatic traditions. It will try to estimate whether the diversity encountered allows for any meaningful general statement about theatre history in this period to be made, or whether such statements may always ever be prone to fall far short of the target.

The workshop will be preceded by a lecture by Prof. Alan Fletcher on ‘John Heywood’s Johan Johan, also in room A210, at 2.15 p.m.

12 April, work-in-progress papers: Ms Beatrice Montedoro (University of Oxford), Dr Chunxiao Wei (UNIFR), and Dr Florence Hazrat (UNIGE)

27-28 April, ‘The Challenge of Change’, SAUTE conference, UNINE

3 May, workshop led by Dr Emma Depledge (UNIFR) on 'Biblio-Detectives'

This workshop will focus on the production of early modern paper and books to explore the insights material texts can provide into the works we study. We will tackle a series of hands-on exercises, including: how to determine the format of a book, using printers’ ornaments to determine the order of printing, using paper to date books, and differentiating between (likely) authorial variants and print shop errors and interference. Although the main focus will be on early modern paper and books, the workshop should also be of interest to medievalists.

6 May, CUSO doctoral programme, ‘Bibliography and Book History’, UNIFR

11-13 May, ‘Space, Place and Image in Early Modern England’ conference, UNIL

12-13 May, CUSO doctoral programme, ‘Literature and Cognition’, UNIGE

17 May, work-in-progress papers: Dr Sarah Baccianti (UNIL) and Dr Maria Shmygol (UNIGE)

27 May, CUSO doctoral programme, ‘Emotion and Culture in the Middle Ages’, UNIGE

 

 

Autumn 2016

Wednesdays, 4.15-6.45 p.m., Room, A 210, Uni Bastions, Aile Jura

 

28 Sept. Prof. Kevin Curran (UNIL), ‘The Legal Imagination: Archive, Practice, Concept’

Between 1400 and 1700, English legal culture underwent massive changes on a number of fronts: textual, professional, procedural, jurisdictional. With this in mind, this workshop invites participants to consider two basic questions: (1) how did law shape fundamental aspects of thought and experience in the late medieval & early modern periods? (2) what sort of evidence helps us address this subject?

12 Oct. Work-in-progress papers: Ms Stephanie Allen (UNIFR), Ms Aleida Auld (UNIGE), and Ms Camille Marshall (UNIL)

13 Oct., 6.15 p.m., University of Geneva, Bodmer Lab Lecture, Prof. Michael Suarez, S.J. (University of Virginia), ‘Why World Literature Requires Global Book History’

15 Oct., Medieval and Early Modern Studies Travelling Seminar: Autumn Full-Day Workshop, University of Lausanne, with Prof. Anthony Bale (University of London, Birkbeck)

26 Oct. Dr Oliver Morgan (UNIGE),‘Analysing Dialogue in Medieval & Early Modern Texts’

‘It seems odd’, Lynne Magnusson has remarked, that we have ‘so few shared terms or concepts’ with which to ‘talk about dialogue as opposed to single voiced poems or speeches’. This workshop looks at ways in which a turn-taking model of conversation (borrowed from interactional linguistics) can help us, as literary critics, to develop a richer and more accurate vocabulary for the analysis of dialogue.

16 Nov. Prof. Bart van Es (University of Oxford), ‘Shakespeare versus Blackfriars: Hamlet, Othello, and the Boys’ Acting Companies 1599-1604’

This seminar explores Shakespeare’s response to the repertory of the newly established child acting companies at St Paul’s and Blackfriars around the turn of the century, especially in Hamlet (1600-1) and Othello (1603-4). We will look at the distinctive audience, production conventions, and physical place of the indoor playhouses. Considering but also moving beyond the idea of a ‘poets’ war’, the seminar encourages creative reappraisal of Shakespeare’s relationship with his fellow dramatists.

Prof. van Es will also give a lecture on ‘“Captive Children”: John Lyly, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, & Child Impressment on the Early Modern Stage, room A210, 10.15 a.m.

30 Nov. Prof. Greg Walker (University of Edinburgh), ‘“Sources” for (Very) Early English Reformation History’

The seminar examines John Heywood’s ‘Play of the Weather’ and the chronicler Edward Hall’s account of Thomas More’s address to the opening of the Reformation Parliament. Is the latter a ‘source’ or context for the former? Is the literary text an ironic comment on the parliamentary speech, or are both better thought of as literary engagements with the early stages of Henry VIII's  supremacy? What are the advantages, and the dangers, of reading literature historically and history with a literary sensibility?

14 Dec. Work-in-progress papers, Dr Alice Leonard (UNINE) and Dr Juliette Vuille (University of Oxford)

 

Spring 2016

Wednesdays, 4.15-6.45 p.m., Room, A 210, Uni Bastions, Aile Jura

 

2 March, lecture by Prof. Daniel Wakelin (University of Oxford), ‘Page Design?’, University of Lausanne, Amphipole 189.1, 10.30 a.m.

2 March (NB: in Room B307), performance of Marge and Jules, followed by discussion

Marge and Julesis an hour-long play, written and performed by Sarah Anson and Mairin O’Hagan. Marge and Jules resurrects the historic moment where – as writings record – Margery Kempe met Dame Julian of Norwich. As spiritual enlightenment meets the darker stories of life in the Middle Ages, these women confess all; talking faith, life, after-life, semantics, erotics and the mysteries of the man they love. With a post-show discussion, led by Professor Elisabeth Dutton (UNIFR), about the challenges of adapting Julian and Margery to dramatic performance, and of presenting the medieval world on the modern stage. 

12 March, CUSO Travelling Seminar, Medieval & Early Modern English Literature: Religion and Early Modern Literature, Univ. of Fribourg (with Prof. Brian Cummings, University of York)

16 March (NB: at the University of Lausanne, 5.15 p.m., Room Anthropole 2055), workshop led by Dr Daniel Starza Smith (Lincoln College, Oxford) and Ms Jana Dambrogio (MIT) on ‘Letterlocking in Shakespeare’s England: The Art and Technology of Epistolary Security’

31 March – 2 April Late Medieval Devotional Compilations in England conference, University of Lausanne

12 April, lecture by Prof. Greg Walker (Univ. of Edinburgh), ‘Sir David Lyndsay’s “A Satire of the Three Estates”: The Greatest Renaissance Play that you have Never Seen?’, Univ. of Geneva, room A214, 10.15 a.m.

13 April, workshop led by Prof. Greg Walker (University of Edinburgh) on ‘Arrested Development?: Bruegel’s Children and Shakespeare’s Clowns?’. From 2.15 to 4 p.m., Prof. Walker will teach a seminar on Chaucer’s Knight’s Tale, also in room A210.

27 April, jointly-led ‘Bring a Text / Present a Problem’ workshop. Each participant brings a short text and/or problem they have encountered in their research and has ten minutes to present it to or share it with the group. The text and/or problem can be of any kind, literary, critical, bibliographical, methodological, etc. The only requirements are that it/they be related to research and can be profitably shared with the group in ca. 10 minutes.

30 April            CUSO Travelling Seminar, Medieval & Early Modern English Literature: How to Write a Life in Early Modern England, Univ. of Fribourg (with Prof. Alan Stewart, Columbia University)

11 May, workshop led by Dr Damien Boquet (University of Aix-Marseille): ‘Une histoire culturelle des émotions au Moyen Âge’. The workshop will be preceded by a lecture by Dr Boquet on ‘De l’amour courtois à une éthique aristocratique de l'affectivité’, also in room A210, at 2.15 p.m.

25 May, workshop led by Prof. Lynne Magnusson (University of Toronto) on ‘The Language of Literature’

26 May             Lecture by Prof. Brian Cummings (University of York), ‘Erasmus on Literature and Knowledge’, University of Geneva, room tba

9-11 September    SAMEMES conference, University of Zurich: ‘What Is an Image in Medieval and Early Modern England’

 

Autumn 2015

Wednesdays, 4.15-6.45 p.m., Room, A 210, Uni Bastions, Aile Jura

 

23 Sept.   Ovid in English Literature: a collectively led workshop. The Roman writer Ovid had a significant afterlife in both medieval and early modern literature, and in this workshop we will consider the importance of his writings across both periods. Medievalists and early modernists will relflect on the impact that Ovid had in their respective fields, and we will focus on a medieval and an early modern text based on Ovid, and discuss how his work has been translated or adapted.

7 Oct.       Prof. Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex), ‘Thomas Nashe and the Morality Tradition’. This workshop will explore the vexed relationship between Thomas Nashe’s complicated and provocative prose writings – in particular, the works that established his reputation, Pierce Peniless His Supplication to the Divell (1592), Christ’s Tears Over Jerusalem (1593) and The Unfortunate Traveller (1594) in relation to an established Christian morality tradition.

8 Oct.                  Lecture by Prof. Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex) at the University of Fribourg

21 Oct.     Work-in-progress papers: Dr Kathrin Scheuchzer (UNIBE) and Ms Marie Waltz (UNIL)

11 Nov.    Prof. Lorna Hutson (University of St. Andrews), ‘The “Unscene”: Meantime, Elsewhere and Motive in Early English drama’. This workshop will investigate to what extent drama from the late 15th to the late 16th century enables us to imagine extra-mimetic elements, elements that can’t be staged. I’ll probably use extracts from plays like the Wakefield Second Shepherd’s Play, Lindsay’s Satyre of the Threi Estatis, Gorboduc, Gammer Gurton, the anon Edward III, Shakespeare’s King Lear to ask questions about how dramatists enable us to infer/imagine what we can’t see.

The workshop will be preceded by a lecture by Prof. Hutson on ‘Circumstantial Shakespeare’, also in room A210, at 10.15 a.m.

12 Nov.              Lecture by Prof. Lorna Hutson (University of St. Andrews) at the University of Fribourg

25 Nov.    Work-in-progress papers: Dr Rory Critten (UNIBE / UNIFR) and Dr Devani Singh (UNIGE)

28 Nov.              CUSO Doctoral Programme: Tools for Digital Humanities: A Practical Workshop, Univ. of Neuchâtel (with Prof. Elena Pierazzo, University of Grenoble / King’s College London)

9 Dec.      Thinking about Materiality: a workshop led by Dr Sarah Brazil (UNIGE). This workshop will explore how materiality can be integrated into work on clothing, particularly work that considers skins, leather, fur, or any such type of material used to make clothes. We will try to explore what directions such research might take.

 

 

Spring 2015

Wednesdays, 4.15-6.45 p.m., Room, A 210, Uni Bastions, Aile Jura

 

25 February, Workshop led by Prof. Indira Ghose (University of Fribourg) on ‘Early Modern Courtesy Literature and the Textual Transmission of Cultural Capital’

7 March, CUSO Travelling Seminar, Medieval & Early Modern English Literature: Poetics’, Univ. of Neuchâtel (with Russ McDonald, Goldsmiths College, London)

18 March, Work-in-progress papers by Derek Dunne (University of Fribourg) and Marco Nievergelt (University of Lausanne)

1 April, Workshop led by Dr David Matthews (University of Manchester) on ‘Fame and Oblivion: Remembering Middle English Texts after Reform’. This workshop will consider texts from the Middle Ages which were reproduced in the Tudor period (e.g. sixteenth-century editions of the Canterbury Tales) and Tudor texts which reflect on the Middle Ages (e.g. Edward Hall's Chronicle), with particular reference to the contested period of the reign of Henry VII, that time which is in between medieval and early modern.

The workshop will be preceded by a lecture by Dr Matthews on ‘Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: History, Narrative, Description’ in the same room at 2.15 p.m.

15 April, Jointly-led ‘Bring a Text / Present a Problem’ workshop. Each participant brings a short text and/or problem they have encountered in their research and has ten minutes to present it to or share it with the group. The text and/or problem can be of any kind, literary, critical, bibliographical, methodological, etc. The only requirements are that it/they be related to research and can be profitably shared with the group in ca. 10 minutes.

24-26 April, SAUTE conference on ‘Economies of English’ and CUSO doctoral programme module on ‘The Changing Value of English Studies (University of Geneva)

6 May, Practical workshop: Using Digital Resources for Medieval English Studies

20 May, Work-in-progress: FNS research project presentation, by Kirsten Stirling, Kader Hegedüs and Sonia Pernet (University of Lausanne)

4-6 June, CUSO doctoral programme module on ‘Approaching Posthumanism and the Posthuman’ (University of Geneva)

 

Autumn 2014

12-13 September, SAMEMES conference, Drama and Pedagogy in Medieval and Early Modern England, University of Fribourg

1 October, Jointly-led ‘Bring a Text / Present a Problem’ workshop. Each participant brings a short text and/or problem they have encountered in their research and has ten minutes to present it to or share it with the group. The text and/or problem can be of any kind, literary, critical, bibliographical, methodological, etc. The only requirements are that it/they be related to research and can be profitably shared with the group in ca. 10 minutes.

15 October, work-in-progress: FNS research project presentation, by Denis Renevey, Marleen Cré and Diana Denissen (all Lausanne)

17-18 October, CUSO doctoral programme in English, module on ‘Theories of Intermediality, Brienz, Hotel Lindenhof

22 October, Dr Stewart Brookes (Digital Humanities, King’s College London) will lead a workshop on DigiPal, the Digital Resource and Database for Palaeography, Manuscript Studies and Diplomatic.

12 November, work-in-progress papers: Angela Benza (Geneva), Amy Brown (Geneva), and Beatrice Montedoro (Oxford)

26 November, Practical workshop: using EEBO, EEBO-TCP, the ESTC and other digital resources for early modern English studies

6 December, CUSO doctoral programme in English, PhD Day, University of Neuchâtel

10 December, from the MA thesis to the doctorate: Mark Darcy (Geneva), Aleida Demartin (Geneva), Azamat Rakhimov (Geneva), Kilian Schindler (Fribourg)

 

Archive

Spring 2014

19 February, Lucy Perry leading a workshop on ‘The Ethics and Aesthetics of Translation’

5 March, Sarah Kelen leading a workshop on ‘Chaucer as an Early Modern Author’

19 March, work-in-progress papers: Matthias Heim (Neuchâtel) and Nadine Weiss (Geneva)

20-21 March, CUSO doctoral programme in English, module on ‘Postfeminism’, University of Lausanne

2 April, work-in-progress papers: Beatrice Montedoro (Oxford) and Nicole Nyffenegger (Bern)

3 April, 3.15 p.m., lecture by Laurie Maguire (Oxford), ‘Hail Muse, etcetera!’, University of Fribourg

4 April, 2.15 p.m., SAUTE AGM and lectures by Ina Haberman (Basel) and Martin Hilpert (Neuchâtel), University of Berne, UniS, A 022

5 April, CUSO doctoral programme in English, PhD Skills Day, University of Geneva

16 April, a jointly-led workshop on bibliography (details tba)

30 April, a practical workshop on funding led by Emma Depledge (Geneva) and Mary Flannery (Lausanne)

9-11 May, CUSO doctoral programme in English, module on ‘Literary Theories’, Schloss und Seminarcenter Münchenwiler, Morat, canton de Berne

20 May, 11 a.m., lecture by Patrick Cheney (Penn State) on ‘Editing English Renaissance Poetry’, University of Geneva, B 307

21 May, Patrick Cheney (Penn State) leading a workshop on ‘Authorship, Influence and Intertextuality’

 

Autumn 2013

26 September, University of Fribourg, 3.15 p.m., lecture by Tiffany Stern (University of Oxford)

2 October, Work-in-progress papers, Sarah Baccianti (UNIL) and Alice Leonard (UNINE)

16 October, Jointly-led ‘Bring a Text / Present a Problem’ workshop

Each participant brings a short text and/or a problem they have encountered in their research and has ten minutes to present it to or share it with the group. The text and/or problem can be of any kind, literary or critical or bibliographical or methodological or what not. The only requirements are that it/they be related to research and can be profitably shared with the group in ca. 10 minutes.

18-19 October, CUSO doctoral programme module, ‘Literary Geography’, University of Basel

30 October A workshop led by Professor Margaret Tudeau-Clayton (University of Neuchâtel) on blank verse

13 November, University of Lausanne, 5.15 p.m., lecture by Judith Butler, ‘Is Gender (Un)translatable?’

15-16 November, CUSO doctoral programme module, ‘The Media of Literature in the Digital Age’, University of Geneva

20 November A workshop led by Professor Hugh Craig (University of Newcastle, Australia) on computational stylistics and digital research into early modern drama and other literature. This event, co-hosted by Prof. Margaret Tudeau-Clayton (University of Neuchâtel), is cross-listed as a module of the CUSO doctoral programme in English.

27 November, Work-in-progress papers, Emma Depledge and Sarah Brazil

7 December, CUSO doctoral programme PhD day at the University of Neuchâtel

11 December, Professionalization workshop led by Mary Flannery (UNIL)

 

Spring 2013

27 February, Two texts for discussion: the death of Arthur in Malory’s Morte Darthur and the deaths of Antony and Cleopatra in Dryden’s All for Love (passages will disseminated in preparation for the workshop).

8-9 March, University of Bern, Studientag zum Englischen Mittelalter,  www.sem2013.ens.unibe.ch.

13 March, Work-in-progress papers by Mary Flannery(University of Lausanne) and John McGee

25 March (probably 6.15 p.m.), University of Geneva, lecture by Dr Marco Nievergelt (University of Lausanne), Groupe d‘études sur les XVIe et XVIIe siècles, Faculté des Lettres

27 March, Workshop led by Prof. Irena Backus devoted to the topic of ‘Religious Satire or Religion of Satire? The Ridiculing of Religion by Chaucer and Ben Jonson’. Some brief passages from The Canterbury Tales and The Alchemist will be disseminated in preparation. The guiding question of the workshop will be: how does religious satire change between Chaucer’s and Jonson’s time?

17 April, Practical Workshop devoted to managing large Word files and bibliography software, led by Arnaud Barras and Sangam MacDuff

19-20 April, University of Lausanne, SAUTE Conference on ‘Emotion, Affect, Sentiment: The Language and Aesthetics of Feeling’

8 May, Work-in-progress papers by Emilija Kraguevska and Rahel Orgis

15 May, Workshop led by Prof. Daniel Wakelin (University of Oxford):  ‘Making Amends for the Past: Early Modern Corrections of Medieval Texts’

24 May (to be confirmed), 10.15 – 12.00: University of Geneva, lectures by Professors Raphael Lyne (University of Cambridge) and Scott Newstok (Rhodes College, Memphis)

7-8 June: University of Bern, Conference 2013 on ‘The Five Senses in Medieval and Early Modern Cultures: Literature and Language’ (note that the SAMEMES AGM will take place at this conference on 7 June)

 

Autumn 2012

Wednesdays, 4.15-6.45 p.m. (fortnightly), A 210

7-9 September, CUSO doctoral programme module on ‘New Aesthetic Paradigms’, Brienz (canton Berne)

26 September, Work-in-progress papers by Emma Depledge and Oliver Morgan

3 October, 5-7 p.m., workshop with Prof. William Kennedy (Cornell) on ‘Ronsard and Shakespeare: The Economics of Revision’ at the University of Fribourg, Salle Laure Dupraz (Kinderstube) (PhD students can have travel expenses reimbursed by CUSO)

4-6 October, CUSO doctoral programme module on ‘English in a Multilingual World’, Kloster Kappel am Albis (canton Zurich)

10 October, Two texts for discussion

In this workshop, we will collectively discuss, compare and contrast two well-known, short texts, one medieval (Chaucer’s ‘Wife of Bath’s Tale’) and one early modern (the first canto of Book I of Spenser’s Faerie Queene) in order to investigate what it means for these texts to be ‘medieval’ or ‘early modern’.

24 October, Workshop led by Prof. Elisabeth Dutton (University of Fribourg), title and topic to be announced

14 November, Practical workshop on the topic of conference papers: from conception to publication

28 November, Work-in-progress papers by Kathrin Reist (University of Berne) and a second person, to be announced

8 December, CUSO doctoral programme PhD day (venue tba)

12 December, Group-led workshop on the topic of mediality

Whether or not we agree that ‘the medium is the message’ (Marshall Luhan), there is no denying that mediality is of importance for all of us. Loosely defined, for our purpose, as the material channels through which (literary) data reach us, media raise important questions. For example: What is the relation of media to content? If literature is designed for more than one medium (e.g. drama), what difference do the respective media make? If a medieval or early modern literary work is transferred into a modern medium (think the Zemeckis Beowulf), does the original subsist and, if yes, how and what of it? Each of us will briefly present and offer for discussion a problem, question, or issue we have encountered in our work related to mediality.

 

Spring 2012

Wednesdays, 4.15-6.45 p.m. (fortnightly), B 220

29 February, Writing book reviews

14 March, Work-in-progress papers by Sarah Brazil and Susanna Gebhardt

28 March, Using electronic databases in research and teaching

25 April, Workshop led by Prof. Alan Fletcher, University College Dublin.

Friday, 27 April 14.00-17.30 (Neuchâtel): SAUTE AGM with talks by Rachel Falconer and Olga Timofeeva.

9 May, Work in progress: Erzsi Kukorelly and Patricia Ronan.

18-20 May (Bern), Association for the Study of New Literatures in English, 23rd annual conference: Post Empire Imaginaries. Medieval strand: Medieval Imaginaries of History, Alterity and Empire

23 May, Group-led session on “gender.”

Whether or not we are methodically using gender theories in our work, most of us in the course of our reading are confronted by issues that relate to gender. In this session we shall discuss how gender matters and explore our aims, methods, experiences, and/or problems in regarding our texts and sources through the gendered lens.

27-29 June (Lausanne), SAMEMES conference: Literature, Science and Medicine in the Medieval and Early Modern English Periods

 

Autumn 2011

Wednesdays, 4.15-6.45 p.m. (fortnightly), B 220

5 October, work-in-progress papers by Keith McDonald (University of Leicester) and Fiona Tolhurst

19 October, workshop led by Prof. Rachel Falconer (University of Lausanne)

2 November, no workshop – CUSO PhD day in Geneva on 5 November instead

5 November, CUSO Doctoral Programme PhD day, University of Geneva

16 November, visit to and practical workshop at the Musée de l’imprimerie in Lyon

30 November, work-in-progress papers by John McGee and Juliette Vuille (University of Lausanne)

2-3 December, CUSO Doctoral Programme module, ‘Designing the Body’, University of Geneva

14 December, workshop on the topic of history

 

Spring 2011

Wednesdays, 4.15-6.45 p.m. (fortnightly), B 220

2 March, Workshop led by Prof. Neil Forsyth (University of Lausanne) on John Milton’s Paradise Lost (III)

4-5 March, CUSO Doctoral Programme module, ‘Literature and Altered States’, Crêt-Bérard

16 March, Workshop led by Prof. Neil Forsyth (University of Lausanne) on John Milton’s Paradise Lost (IV)

30 March , Work-in-progress papers by Dana Monah and Petya Ivanova

13 April, Workshop devoted to editing, led by Lukas Erne

22-29 April, Easter break

4 May, Workshop led by Prof. Annette Kern-Stähler (University of Berne) on medieval authorship

6-7 May, SAUTE conference, ‘On the Move: Mobilities in English Language and Literature’, University of Berne

17-22 May, Shakespeare-in-Performance Study Trip to London and Stratford-upon-Avon

25 May, Work-in-progress papers by Tamsin Badcoe and Rahel Orgis

17-19 June, CUSO Doctoral Programme module, ‘The Violence of Aesthetics – The Aesthetics of Violence’,

University of Zurich

                                   

Autumn 2010

Spring 2010

Autumn 2009

Spring 2009

Autumn 2008

Spring 2008