DIGITAL WORKSHOPS

Previous workshops

Popularizing science on digital media (12.10, 19.10, 3.11, 10.11 and 18.11 2022)

General objectives

Popularizing scientific research and making it both understandable and attractive on a digital media support for a non-specialist audience is a real challenge for any scientist. This module enables doctoral and post-doctoral students to develop an effective text and visual message to communicate persuasively through digital media and thus share their research, hypotheses, results, opinions with a wide non-scientific audience.

 

Organization

Participants will work on one of their own productions (e.g. a research summary) that they will revise and complete (text, visual, storytelling) throughout the workshops. In this way, participants commit themselves to taking the time to do the required exercises before and between the workshops.

As an option, participants who are not familiar with visual creation can participate in an introductory workshop on a visual creation software (i.e., workshop 2).

 

This module consists of four workshops:

  • Workshop 0 (optional): Introduction to Software for Visual Creation

  • Workshop 1: Visual Communication for Digital Media

  • Workshop 2: Storytelling and Storyboarding Science

 

  • Workshop 3: Writing for Digital Media and the General Public

 

 

Workshop 0: Introduction to Software for Visual Creation

 

Descriptive

This workshop is an introduction to the use of graphic design software in general. Using Affinity Designer, which is typical of most software in its category, we will cover the different stages of graphic creation from idea to production.

 

Objectives

  • Basic knowledge of graphic design software
  • Basic knowledge of photo editing software
  • Ability to choose the right software
  • Understand the characteristics of an illustration in object mode
  • Understand the characteristics of a photo in point mode
  • Choose the right file types for different needs

 

Content

  • Software interface
    • Workspace
    • Document configuration
    • Unit of measurement
  • Creation
    • Creation tools
    • Selection, modification
    • Layout
  • Technical constraints (digital world)
    • Image format
    • File size
    • Type of file
    • Compression
    • Variations

 

Speaker

Julien Jespersen works at the Division of Training and Students (DIFE) as a web developer. He has worked as a graphic designer for many years at the Cultural Activities and Communication Service of UNIGE. In addition, he runs courses in page layout and illustration within the DIFE.

 

 

Workshop 1: Visual Communication for Digital Media

 

Descriptive

The visual communication workshop aims to provide the theoretical knowledge and practical means to create graphic elements in order to communicate messages to a non-educated target audience via digital media. Through an alternation of theoretical and practical presentations, participants will be led to ask themselves the right questions and to mobilise the best means to achieve their communication objective. They will be asked to exchange and confront their views on their own creations within their group.

 

Objectives

  • Ability to prepare visual elements for the electronic media
  • Build concise and engaging visual elements from complex material
  • Understand the basics of codes and registers of graphic expression
  • To know how to make simple graphic compositions

 

Content

  • Graphic composition
    • Consistency
    • Efficiency
    • RegisterConsistency of the message
  • Basics of graphic design
    • Dimensions, orientation
    • Full, empty
    • Grid, margins, alignment
    • Colors
    • Typography
  • Recipient of the message
    • Who
    • What, action
    • Notion of time
    • Notion of space
  • Analysis and comparison
    • Identification of criteria
    • Confrontation of opinions
    • Objectivity and subjectivity

 

Speaker

 

Julien Jespersen works at the Division of Training and Students (DIFE) as a web developer. He has worked as a graphic designer for many years at the Cultural Activities and Communication Service of UNIGE. In addition, he runs courses in page layout and illustration within the DIFE.

 

 

Workshop 2: Storytelling and Storyboarding Science

 

Descriptive

I seek to challenge, inspire and train scientists to use narrative techniques and strategies employed in film to produce persuasive presentations, publications and digital media tools. Borrowing communication strategies and techniques from filmmakers and applying them in science communication and popularization will help scientists for better communication of their research to a non-expert audience through digital media, and scientists are wise enough to do so!

 

Objectives

  • Persuasive communication of our research, divulgation and publication
  • Preparing script and storyboard about our research
  • Audio-visual literacy: Better understanding and interpretation of films
  • The use of storytelling in digital media

 

Content

  • Theory: Story and narrative, storytelling in science, script writing and storyboarding, alternative narrative structures.
  • Practice: Participants re-write their biography, summaries of their already published (or in preparation) papers and presentations based on what they learn in the workshop.

 

Language

English

 

Speaker

Samer Angelone holds two PhDs in Film Studies and Biology. He is the founder of the Global Science Film Festival, and works as a jury-member for prestigious international film festivals. Angelone has directed several fiction and documentary films. He teaches 'Filmmaking for Scientists', 'Storytelling & Storyboarding Science', and 'Video-journalism for Scientists' at different universities, research institutes and film festivals. www.sciencefilm.ch

 

 

 

Workshop 3: Writing for Digital Media and the General Public

 

Descriptive

Writing to be read and understood by a wide audience is a puzzle for researchers, especially in digital media. How to get attention? How do you convey sharp knowledge, complex concepts?
By observing the rules of effective writing, it becomes possible to solve these questions. At least partially. Let's look at some of them: determine your target audience, choose your vocabulary level; limit the number of words per sentence; use the present tense of the indicative; find good examples.
This training is intended to be concrete and offers practical tools that are easy to implement.

 

Objectives

  • Know the rules of efficient writing;
  • Know how to title your text/article;
  • To understand the principle of the hat of an article;
  • Know the expectations of digital media for scientific texts;
  • Analyze your texts according to Lasswell's proposal: Who says what to whom by what means and with what effect;
  • Practice effective writing.

 

Content

Theoretical contributions: writing in a simple way, knowing how the reader approaches a text, adopting the rules of effective writing, writing the title and caption of an article.
Practical exercises: writing the catchphrases of an article, working on the text/article/abstract that will have been submitted at the time of registration.

 

 

Speaker

Jean-Blaise Held, MicroPlume sàrl (http://www.microplume.ch), is an adult trainer and coach in the field of oral and written communication: effective writing, media training, speeches, conducting interviews, public speaking. He was a lecturer at UNIFR from 2004 to 2020 (public relations, journalistic writing, web writing, mediatraining). He teaches written and oral communication at the HEIA Fribourg and for further education at the HEG Fribourg. Mr. Held was a journalist at RTS for 20 years and editor in charge of the Cahiers protestants (2000-2004).

 

 

Good practice in security and protection of digital data for young researchers (October 24 2022)

Descriptive

Digital data are precious for the young researcher because they often constitute the raw material of his/her work. A major challenge for the researcher will be to guarantee the durability of the data while respecting the institutional rules and the laws in force (LIPAD, RGPD). This is a major challenge since it implies not only a routine of good practices (backup, password, updating, etc.), but also a broader knowledge of the security issues of the digital society around data (hacking, phishing, etc.).

Objectives

At the end of the workshop, the participant will be able to:

  • apply good practice in digital data security
  • have an overview of the rules and laws on digital data protection
  • have been exposed to a simulated cyber-attack

Content

  • Security criteria
  • Data protection
  • Awareness of cyber-attacks, hacking, phishing, ...

Institutional and legal framework (LIPAD, RGPD, others)

 

 

Speakers

Dr. Eduardo Solana is a lecturer in cryptography and security at the Department of Computer Science of the University of Geneva, where he created one of the first university courses in this field in Switzerland in the 1990s. Among others, he has worked for IBM and PricewaterhouseCoopers where he was a global expert for authentication solutions. He has over twenty-five years of experience in the fields of cryptography and information security in both the private and academic sectors. During his long career, Dr. Solana has advised multinational companies and governments on issues related to his field of expertise. He has been a speaker at numerous international symposia and congresses and regularly participates in information and disclosure programmes on cyber security in the media.


Alexandre-Quentin Berger is an assistant and doctoral student in the TCS (Theoretical Computer Science) laboratory at the Department of Computer Science of the University of Geneva. With thirteen years of studies and eight years of teaching experience, he is also regularly involved in student associations, student counselling or the improvement of the proposed courses and curricula. His field of research and teaching is theoretical computer science, and is mainly centred around two axes: complexity and game theory, and cryptography and computer security.

 

Pierre Bergerat is a student of the Master in Digital Systems and Services, specialized in information security. Comptia security+ certified and currently writing his thesis on the security of autonomous vehicles, his fields of expertise are penetration testing and automation.

The keys to effective digital profiling and social networking (September 19 and 26 2022)

Objectives

Social networks and digital platforms have become essential for the doctoral student to propel a professional career. But you need to know how they work to make your effects effective. These two workshops will enable you to build a coherent digital profile through digital media and platforms, as well as to plan an effective strategy of interventions and publications on media networks from a professional career development perspective.

 

 

Workshop 1: Social networks, collaborative platforms and your digital profile

 

Objectives
What is social media? How and why should you use it? And which content works best on which platform? After this introductory workshop on digital working you will be ready to put together a social network and collaborative combination that will serve your professional purpose. Learn what you need to get move forward.

 

Content
- Overview of social networks (Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube...) and collaborative platforms (academia, ResearchGate, ORCiD...).
- Which platform does what? Which combination works best for me?
- Learn the basics of a professional profile.
- Media skills (responsible communication, ethics, etc.).
- Perspectives, benefits and limits.

 

 

Workshop 2: Your media strategy at the service of your professional ambitions

 

Objectives

On the basis of the first module, you have your social media platform combination in place, but is your digital research space coherent? And now you are on social media, what do you do next? In this workshop, learn how to work across platforms to network, publish and write for social media to boost your digital research presence.

 

Content
- Create a clear, coherent and consistent digital research space as a basis for a strong collaborative network
- Networking, publishing and writing for social media

- Begin a reflection about your professional researcher digital identity.
- The keys to success.
- Advantages and limitation

 

Speaker
Maura Hannon trained in Political Economy (BA) at University of Western Australia and in Strategy, Marketing, Finance and Economics (MBA) at Curtin University of Technology. Maura has worked in social media for nearly a decade including currently writing content for the Jacobs Foundation, writing and producing short film for social media, and writing for clients in diverse fields like technology, finance and science. For several years, she has been putting her skills to work for academic institutions, notably CUSO, the University of Lausanne and the University of Vienna, for which she has been leading workshops on social media and collaborative platforms for young researchers. 

 

Ethics and Data : a Digital Responsibility issue (September 12 2022)

Description
Our society has evolved to a point where it is driven by digital services and data. For good or for bad, time will tell, but clearly with no coming back. On that path of digital transition, young researchers must be acutely aware of its responsibility when designing systems, services and doing research. Understanding the underlying implications, principles and how to reason in this new environment is now essential for young researchers.

 

Objectives
This session aims at raising awareness on the increasing responsibility we have as researchers facing the digitization of our society by introducing simple and concrete elements that can be leveraged to assess ethical and social issues in this context of a service and data driven society.

 
Content
After introducing the context and the general concerns, we will introduce a framework for reasoning on ethical and social issues in ICT. Basic principle will be presented and discussed followed by a step by step method to analyze such situations from an ethical and social point of view. Participants will then engage in groupwork to address a concrete situation and present their results to all for discussion. 

 
Speaker
Jean-Henry Morin is associate professor of Information Systems at University of Geneva, Institute of Information Service Science. He is the Director of the bachelor program in Information Systems and Service Science and president of ThinkServices, a Geneva based think(do)tank on Service Science and Innovation, where ThinkData.ch was designed. He was a professor at Korea University Business School, invited professor at Yonsei School of Business and invited researcher at Fasoo.com in South Korea. In 2001 He was a cofounder of a Geneva based company specializing in corporate performance management solutions. His primary research and practice interest is in information security with a particular focus on Digital Rights Management (DRM) in the enterprise sector. His work on Exception Management in DRM environments has been transferred to the industry in partnership with Fasoo.com. This work is within the research area of socially responsible and sustainable security. He also carries out research in blockchain technology, cloud computing, Internet of Things, privacy, data protection, and transparency. His keen interest in Design Thinking as a skill served as a basis for ThinkServices and the creation of an academic FabLab in Geneva. He is the author of a book on digital responsibility (Editions Fyp, 2014) where he suggests the value of informed trust and transparency as the basis of an emerging principle of Co-Compliance (collaborative compliance).

Twitter : @jhmorin

LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/jhmorin/

 

 

Scientific publishing: how to make an informed choice? (May 20 2022)

Description

This one-day workshop will introduce you in the world of the scientific publication and its “Open Access” side. We will talk about the new challenges and issues in this domain, including the last funding agencies requirements, through presentations and case studies. In brief, you will get the keys to perform thoughtful choices for your future publications in order to enhance your scientific career.

 

At the end of this module, you will be able to:

  • Explain the principles of preprints and disseminate your scientific publications as preprints when possible
  • Know and criticize the Journal Impact Factor of scientific journals
  • Compare journals and their publishing models: traditional, Gold Open Access and hybrid
  • Comply with UNIGE and funders' requirements for Open Access
  • Avoid predatory journals
  • Compare traditional and emerging forms of peer review for scientific publications
  • Choose or negotiate the best possible options for the copyright of your scientific publications, based on institutional requirements and your personal interests
  • Create an ORCID identifier to ensure proper identification of your scientific publications and enhance your visibility
  • Follow institutional guidelines for declaring your affiliation(s) to publishers
  • Disseminate your publications through the Green Route of Open Access

 

 

Speakers
Members of the Division de l'Information Scientifique

 

Managing your references to cite them in a legal manner (May 13 2022)

Description

During this workshop, you will learn the best practices for managing your bibliographic references as part of your PhD. With an optimal organization of your sources and a good knowledge of how to avoid plagiarism, in accordance with University guidelines, and respect copyrights, the writing of your academic work will be facilitated. Different tools and methods will be presented and experienced throughout the day.

 

At the end of this module, you will be able to:

  • [Optional] Use Zotero or EndNote to collect and cite your bibliographic references
  • Adopt a proper organization for a large collection of bibliographic references (in Zotero)
  • Comply with plagiarism conventions and rules of conduct
  • Apply the basics of Swiss copyright law when obtaining information and disseminating it
  • Use and produce content distributed under Creative Commons licenses

 

N.B. The first part of the workshop is an introduction to a reference management software, EndNote or Zotero (to choice). A comparison of the software is available here: https://www.unige.ch/biblio/index.php?cID=2758. If you are already familiar with either of these programs, this part is optional. Please specify your choice when you register.

 

 

Speakers
Members of the Division de l'Information Scientifique

 

Managing research data as a junior scientist (May 9 2022)

Description

This one-day workshop will help you improve your skills in everyday and long-term data management, including data organization, storage, sharing and, of course, the FAIR principles. You will learn to comply with the SNSF requirement concerning the submission of a Data Management Plan (DMP) and have time to start writing your first DMP following this template.

 

At the end of this module, you will be able to:

  • Apply good practices for the organization and naming of files
  • Value the importance of metadata
  • Apply good practices for the storage of your research data with tools available at UNIGE
  • Value the advantages of depositing your research data in a repository and select it
  • Complete a Data Management Plan (DMP) following the SNSF template

 

 

Speakers
Members of the Division de l'Information Scientifique

 

Become a digital researcher ! (March 9 and 16 2022)

Objectives
In this module, after completing your profile, you will discover the articulation between the different networks and digital platforms (Workhop 1). You will learn to work systematically across multiple platforms to create a clear, coherent and consistent digital research space, with an action plan that will enable you to make the best use of digital networks and platforms in order to achieve your professional objectives (Workshop 2).

This module is composed of two workshops that target two concerns of the young researcher: the creation of a professional digital identity and the added value to his/her professional career prospects.

Content

  • Workshop 1: Social networks, collaborative platforms and digital profiling
  • Workshop 2: Your media strategy at the service of your professional ambitions

 

 

Workshop 1: Social networks, collaborative platforms and digital profiling

 

Objectives
For each social media that will be presented you will learn the WHY, the WHAT and the WHO related to the use of each of them. You will define how and when to adopt a specific social media and in which context. You will learn the techniques and best practices to actively maintain your profile(s), efficiently and responsibly, for professional purposes. Moreover, you will learn the principal basis to make an active social media listening about your field and/or group of interest.

Content
- Overview of social networks (Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube...) and collaborative platforms (academia, ResearchGate, ORCiD...).
- Which media should be used, and for what purpose?
- Building a profile and refine your social media presence.
- Best practices.
- Personal monitoring and Social media listening.
- Media skills (responsible communication, ethics, etc.).
- Perspectives, benefits and limits .

Speakers

Anne-Laure Payot holds a master's degree in communication and media from the University of Geneva, which she obtained in 2011. She has several years of experience in communication and journalism, notably at the City of Geneva, the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art of Geneva, and 24heures newspaper. She joined the Communication Office at the University of Geneva in 2013. In parallel with social media management, she worked 6 years at the University’s Press office and contributed to the Journal de l’UNIGE. After completing her training as a social media specialist at SAWI, she became head of social media in the communication department of the University of Geneva.

Massimo Caine completed his studies in molecular biology at the University of Padova (B.Sc) and the Catholic University of Leuven (M.Sc), before continuing his research at the University of Lausanne and then Geneva. In parallel, he developed his media skills and founded TheScienceBreaker, of which he is also the chief editor. After various mandates in communication and public relations at University of Geneva since 2014, he became responsible of the social media management of the Faculty of Science and currently runs TheScienceBreaker with a special focus on PhD students training in fundamental science communication (landscape of science communication and outreach publishing).



 

Workshop 2: Your media strategy at the service of your professional ambitions

 

Objectives
On the basis of your identity(ies) sketched out in the first module, you will also have acquired the skills and work practices to set out an action plan with the aim of putting media networks at the service of your professional ambitions. At the end of the workshop, you will have all the keys in hand to act and interact on social media and collaborative platforms in a coherent way in order to your personal professional goals.

Content
- In the professional development of the researcher, the need to create a clear, coherent and consistent digital research space as a basis for a strong collaborative network
- The tools and work practices required to develop an action plan matching where you are in the research cycle
- The beginnings of a reflection about your professional researcher digital identity.
- The keys to success.
- Advantages and limitations.

Speaker
Maura Hannon trained in Political Economy (BA) at Western University Australia and in Strategy, Marketing, Finance and Economics (MBA) at Curtin University of Technology. For the past 20 years, she has translated and edited reports and works in fields as varied as web service, politics, finance, technology and communication for the private and public sectors. For several years, she has been putting her skills to work for academic institutions, notably CUSO and the University of Lausanne, for which she has been leading workshops on social media and collaborative platforms for young researchers.

Legal aspects of research data (January 20 2022)

Description

In the European Union and especially in Switzerland, researchers are fortunate to be able to rely on laws to protect their data and research products. But, as with all laws, it is not only necessary to know them, but above all to comply with them in order to benefit from them as much as possible, as well as to be aware of their limits. Based on practical examples with space for questions, this workshop is intended to be short (1h30) and concrete. At the end of the workshop, the young researchers will have a global and up-to-date view of the current legal context applying on data and research led in Switzerland, with an overview of future trends.

Objectives

  • Understand the current national and international legal rules applying to research and research data
  • Know how to apply them to my own data and productions in my research field
  • Be aware of the future trends in laws on research and research data

Content

  • IP rights
  • Data protection and confidential information
  • Challenges for the future

 

Speakers

Yaniv Benhamou (Lawyer and Associate Professor of Digital Law at the University of Geneva Law School) specialises in data protection, intellectual property, art law, internet and technology law (including Big Data, Artificial Intelligence and Digital Humanities). He has completed several research stays, including at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University (2018), the Centre for Media and Communications Law (CMCL) (CMCL) at Melbourne Law School (2016) and the Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, Competition and Tax Law in Munich (2006).

Since 2015, ... (more)

Hélène Bruderer holds a Bachelor's degree in law (2012, Lausanne with a stay in Zurich), a Master's degree in law (2014, Fribourg), a Certificate of Specialization in Law (2015, Geneva) and the bar exam (2017, Republic and Canton of Geneva). She completed her legal internship in the public law department of the law firm Lenz & Staehelin.

In parallel to her studies, she worked as an assistant to Professor Pierre Tercier in Fribourg and also completed a three-month internship at the Secretariat of the International Court of Arbitration of the International Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong.
Since May 2017, she has been working as a research and teaching assistant to Professors Jacques de Werra and Philippe Ducor and is writing a PhD thesis on... (more)

 

Managing your references to cite them in a legal manner (December 17 2021)

Description

During this workshop, you will learn the best practices for managing your bibliographic references as part of your PhD. With an optimal organization of your sources and a good knowledge of how to avoid plagiarism, in accordance with University guidelines, and respect copyrights, the writing of your academic work will be facilitated. Different tools and methods will be presented and experienced throughout the day.

 

At the end of this module, you will be able to:

  • [Optional] Use Zotero or EndNote to collect and cite your bibliographic references
  • Adopt a proper organization for a large collection of bibliographic references (in Zotero)
  • Comply with plagiarism conventions and rules of conduct
  • Apply the basics of Swiss copyright law when obtaining information and disseminating it
  • Use and produce content distributed under Creative Commons licenses

 

N.B. The first part of the workshop is an introduction to a reference management software, EndNote or Zotero (to choice). A comparison of the software is available here: https://www.unige.ch/biblio/index.php?cID=2758. If you are already familiar with either of these programs, this part is optional. Please specify your choice when you register.

 

Audience
Doctoral and post-doctoral students

 

Speakers
Members of the Division de l'Information Scientifique

 

Popularizing science on digital media: a real challenge for young researchers (30.11; 9.12; 16.12 and 21.12)

General objectives

Popularizing scientific research and making it both understandable and attractive on a digital media support for a non-specialist audience is a real challenge for any scientist. This module enables doctoral and post-doctoral students to develop an effective text and visual message to communicate persuasively through digital media and thus share their research, hypotheses, results, opinions with a wide non-scientific audience.

 

Organization

Participants will work on one of their own productions (e.g. a research summary) that they will revise and complete (text, visual, storytelling) throughout the workshops. In this way, participants commit themselves to taking the time to do the required exercises before and between the workshops.

As an option, participants who are not familiar with visual creation can participate in an introductory workshop on a visual creation software (i.e., workshop 2).

 

This module consists of four workshops:

  • Workshop 1: Writing for Digital Media and the General Public
    November 30, 1:15-5:00 pm (in French)

  • Workshop 2: Introduction to Software for Visual Creation (optional)
    December 9, 9:15-12:00 am (in French)

  • Workshop 3: Visual Communication for Digital Media
    December 16, 9:15-12:00 am (in French)

  • Workshop 4: Storytelling and Storyboarding Science
    December 21, 1:15-5:00 pm (in English)

 

Audience
Doctoral and post-doctoral students.

 

 

Workshop 1: Writing for Digital Media and the General Public

 

Description

Writing to be read and understood by a wide audience is a puzzle for researchers, especially in digital media. How to get attention? How do you convey sharp knowledge, complex concepts?
By observing the rules of effective writing, it becomes possible to solve these questions. At least partially. Let's look at some of them: determine your target audience, choose your vocabulary level; limit the number of words per sentence; use the present tense of the indicative; find good examples.
This training is intended to be concrete and offers practical tools that are easy to implement.

 

Objectives

  • Know the rules of efficient writing;
  • Know how to title your text/article;
  • To understand the principle of the hat of an article;
  • Know the expectations of digital media for scientific texts;
  • Analyze your texts according to Lasswell's proposal: Who says what to whom by what means and with what effect;
  • Practice effective writing.

 

Content

  • Theoretical contributions: writing in a simple way, knowing how the reader approaches a text, adopting the rules of effective writing, writing the title and caption of an article.
  • Practical exercises: writing the catchphrases of an article, working on the text/article/abstract that will have been submitted at the time of registration.

 

Speakers

Jean-Blaise Held, MicroPlume sàrl (http://www.microplume.ch), is an adult trainer and coach in the field of oral and written communication: effective writing, media training, speeches, conducting interviews, public speaking. He was a lecturer at UNIFR from 2004 to 2020 (public relations, journalistic writing, web writing, mediatraining). He teaches written and oral communication at the HEIA Fribourg and for the continuing education of the HEG Fribourg. Mr Held was a journalist at RTS for 20 years and editor in charge of Cahiers protestants (2000-2004).

 

 

 

Workshop 2: Introduction to Software for Visual Creation

 

Description

This workshop is an introduction to the use of graphic design software in general. Using Affinity Designer, which is typical of most software in its category, we will cover the different stages of graphic creation from idea to production.

 

Objectives

  • Basic knowledge of graphic design software
  • Basic knowledge of photo editing software
  • Ability to choose the right software
  • Understand the characteristics of an illustration in object mode
  • Understand the characteristics of a photo in point mode
  • Choose the right file types for different needs

 

Content

  • Software interface
    • Workspace
    • Document configuration
    • Unit of measurement
  • Creation
    • Creation tools
    • Selection, modification
    • Layout
  • Technical constraints (digital world)
    • Image format
    • File size
    • Type of file
    • Compression
    • Variations

 

Speaker

Julien Jespersen works at the Division of Training and Students (DIFE) as a web developer. He has worked as a graphic designer for many years at the Cultural Activities and Communication Service of UNIGE. In addition, he runs courses in page layout and illustration within the DIFE.

 

 

Workshop 3: Visual communication for digital media

 

Description

The visual communication workshop aims to provide the theoretical knowledge and practical means to create graphic elements in order to communicate messages to a non-educated target audience via digital media. Through an alternation of theoretical and practical presentations, participants will be led to ask themselves the right questions and to mobilise the best means to achieve their communication objective. They will be asked to exchange and confront their views on their own creations within their group.

 

Objectives

  • Ability to prepare visual elements for the electronic media
  • Build concise and engaging visual elements from complex material
  • Understand the basics of codes and registers of graphic expression
  • To know how to make simple graphic compositions

 

Content

  • Graphic composition
    • Consistency
    • Efficiency
    • Register
    • Coherence of the message
  • Basics of graphic design
    • Dimensions, orientation
    • Fills, voids
    • Grid, margins, alignment
    • Colours
    • Typography
  • Recipient of the message
    • Who
    • What, action
    • Notion of time
    • Notion of space
  • Analysis and comparison
    • Identification of criteria
    • Confrontation of opinions
    • Objectivity and subjectivity

 

Speaker

Julien Jespersen (see workshop 2)

 

 

 

Workshop 4: Storytelling and Storyboarding Science

 

Description

I seek to challenge, inspire and train scientists to use narrative techniques and strategies employed in film to produce persuasive presentations, publications and digital media tools. Borrowing communication strategies and techniques from filmmakers and applying them in science communication and popularization will help scientists for better communication of their research to a non-expert audience through digital media, and scientists are wise enough to do so!

 

Objectives

  • Persuasive communication of our research, divulgation and publication
  • Preparing script and storyboard about our research
  • Audio-visual literacy: Better understanding and interpretation of films
  • The use of storytelling in digital media

 

Content

  • Theory: Story and narrative, storytelling in science, script writing and storyboarding, alternative narrative structures.
  • Practice: Participants re-write their biography, summaries of their already published (or in preparation) papers and presentations based on what they learn in the workshop.

 

Speaker

Samer Angelone holds two PhDs in Film Studies and Biology. He is the founder of the Global Science Film Festival, and works as a jury-member for prestigious international film festivals. Angelone has directed several fiction and documentary films. He teaches 'Filmmaking for Scientists', 'Storytelling & Storyboarding Science', and 'Video-journalism for Scientists' at different universities, research institutes and film festivals www.sciencefilm.ch

 

Scientific publishing: how to make an informed choice? (November 22 2021)

Description

This one-day workshop will introduce you in the world of the scientific publication and its “Open Access” side. We will talk about the new challenges and issues in this domain, including the last funding agencies requirements, through presentations and case studies. In brief, you will get the keys to perform thoughtful choices for your future publications in order to enhance your scientific career.

 

At the end of this module, you will be able to:

  • Explain the principles of preprints and disseminate your scientific publications as preprints when possible
  • Know and criticize the Journal Impact Factor of scientific journals
  • Compare journals and their publishing models: traditional, Gold Open Access and hybrid
  • Comply with UNIGE and funders' requirements for Open Access
  • Avoid predatory journals
  • Compare traditional and emerging forms of peer review for scientific publications
  • Choose or negotiate the best possible options for the copyright of your scientific publications, based on institutional requirements and your personal interests
  • Create an ORCID identifier to ensure proper identification of your scientific publications and enhance your visibility
  • Follow institutional guidelines for declaring your affiliation(s) to publishers
  • Disseminate your publications through the Green Route of Open Acces

 

Speakers
Members of the Division de l'Information Scientifique

 

Managing research data as a junior scientist (November 15 2021)

Description

This one-day workshop will help you improve your skills in everyday and long-term data management, including data organization, storage, sharing and, of course, the FAIR principles. You will learn to comply with the SNSF requirement concerning the submission of a Data Management Plan (DMP) and have time to start writing your first DMP following this template.

 

At the end of this module, you will be able to:

  • Apply good practices for the organization and naming of files
  • Value the importance of metadata
  • Apply good practices for the storage of your research data with tools available at UNIGE
  • Value the advantages of depositing your research data in a repository and select it
  • Complete a Data Management Plan (DMP) following the SNSF template

 

Speakers
Members of the Division de l'Information Scientifique

 

Become a digital researcher ! (October 14 and 21 2021)

Objectives
In this module, after completing your profile, you will discover the articulation between the different networks and digital platforms (Workshop 1). You will learn to work systematically across multiple platforms to create a clear, coherent and consistent digital research space, with an action plan that will enable you to make the best use of digital networks and platforms in order to achieve your professional objectives (Workshop 2).

This module is composed of two workshops that target two concerns of the young researcher: the creation of a professional digital identity and the added value to his/her professional career prospects.

Content

  • Workshop 1: Social networks, collaborative platforms and your digital profiling
  • Workshop 2: Your media strategy at the service of your professional ambitions



Workshop 1: Social networks, collaborative platforms and your digital profiling

 

Objectives
What is social media? How and why should you use it? And which content works best on which platform? After this introductory workshop on digital working you will be ready to put together a social network and collaborative combination that will serve your professional purpose. Learn what you need to get move forward.

Content
- Overview of social networks (Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube...) and collaborative platforms (academia, ResearchGate, ORCiD...).
- Which platform does what? Which combination works best for me?
- Learn the basics of a professional profile.
- Media skills (responsible communication, ethics, etc.).
- Perspectives, benefits and limits.

 

Workshop 2: Your media strategy at the service of your professional ambitions

 

Objectives
On the basis of the first module, you have your social media platform combination in place, but is your digital research space coherent? And now you are on social media, what do you do next? In this workshop, learn how to work across platforms to network, publish and write for social media to boost your digital research presence.

Content
- Create a clear, coherent and consistent digital research space as a basis for a strong collaborative network
- Networking, publishing and writing for social media

- Begin a reflection about your professional researcher digital identity.
- The keys to success.
- Advantages and limitation

 

Speaker
Maura Hannon
trained in Political Economy (BA) at University of Western Australia and in Strategy, Marketing, Finance and Economics (MBA) at Curtin University of Technology. Maura has worked in social media for nearly a decade including currently writing content for the Jacobs Foundation, writing and producing short film for social media, and writing for clients in diverse fields like technology, finance and science. For several years, she has been putting her skills to work for academic institutions, notably CUSO, the University of Lausanne and the University of Vienna, for which she has been leading workshops on social media and collaborative platforms for young researchers.

Ethics and Data : a Digital Responsibility issue September 15 2021

Description
Our society has evolved to a point where it is driven by digital services and data. For good or for bad, time will tell, but clearly with no coming back. On that path of digital transition, young researchers must be acutely aware of its responsibility when designing systems, services and doing research. Understanding the underlying implications, principles and how to reason in this new environment is now essential for young researchers.

 

Objectives
This session aims at raising awareness on the increasing responsibility we have as researchers facing the digitization of our society by introducing simple and concrete elements that can be leveraged to assess ethical and social issues in this context of a service and data driven society.

 
Content
After introducing the context and the general concerns, we will introduce a framework for reasoning on ethical and social issues in ICT. Basic principle will be presented and discussed followed by a step by step method to analyze such situations from an ethical and social point of view. Participants will then engage in groupwork to address a concrete situation and present their results to all for discussion. 


Speaker
Jean-Henry Morin is associate professor of Information Systems at University of Geneva, Institute of Information Service Science. He is the Director of the bachelor program in Information Systems and Service Science and president of ThinkServices, a Geneva based think(do)tank on Service Science and Innovation, where ThinkData.ch was designed. He was a professor at Korea University Business School, invited professor at Yonsei School of Business and invited researcher at Fasoo.com in South Korea. In 2001 He was a cofounder of a Geneva based company specializing in corporate performance management solutions. His primary research and practice interest is in information security with a particular focus on Digital Rights Management (DRM) in the enterprise sector. His work on Exception Management in DRM environments has been transferred to the industry in partnership with Fasoo.com. This work is within the research area of socially responsible and sustainable security. He also carries out research in blockchain technology, cloud computing, Internet of Things, privacy, data protection, and transparency. His keen interest in Design Thinking as a skill served as a basis for ThinkServices and the creation of an academic FabLab in Geneva. He is the author of a book on digital responsibility (Editions Fyp, 2014) where he suggests the value of informed trust and transparency as the basis of an emerging principle of Co-Compliance (collaborative compliance).

Twitter : @jhmorin

LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/jhmorin/

 

PhD Library Camp (June 15 and 17 2021)

Workshop 1 “Managing research data as a junior scientist”
June 15 2021, 9:00-16:30

 

This independent one-day workshop will help you improve your skills in everyday and long term data management, including data organization, storage, sharing and, of course, the FAIR principles. You will learn to comply with the new SNSF requirement concerning the submission of a Data Management Plan (DMP) and have time to start writing your first DMP following this template.

At the end of this module, you will be able to:
-       Apply good practices for the organization and naming of files
-       Value the importance of metadata
-       Apply good practices for the storage of your research data with tools available at UNIGE
-       Value the advantages of depositing your research data in a repository and select it
-       Value the advantages of publishing a data paper
-       Complete a Data Management Plan (DMP) following the SNSF template

 

 

Workshop 2 “Scientific publishing: how to make an informed choice?”
June 17 2021, 9:00-16:30

 

This independent one-day workshop will introduce you in the world of the scientific publication and its “Open Access” side. We will talk about the new challenges and issues in this domain, including the last funding agencies requirements and indicators used to evaluate research. In brief, you will get the keys to perform thoughtful choices for your future publications in order to enhance your scientific career.

At the end of this module, you will be able to:
-       Master the scientific publishing process
-       Manage your copyrights as an author
-       Explain the challenges related to Open Access publishing
-       Apply the UNIGE guidelines regarding Open Access
-       Apply the main funding agencies requirements for Open Access publications
-       Enhance your visibility through the creation of an ORCID
-       Find and review the main bibliometric indicators like the Impact factor and the h-index

 

Legal aspects of research data (May 14 2021)

Description

In the European Union and especially in Switzerland, researchers are fortunate to be able to rely on laws to protect their data and research products. But, as with all laws, it is not only necessary to know them, but above all to comply with them in order to benefit from them as much as possible, as well as to be aware of their limits. Based on practical examples with space for questions, this workshop is intended to be short (1h30) and concrete. At the end of the workshop, the young researchers will have a global and up-to-date view of the current legal context applying on data and research led in Switzerland, with an overview of future trends.

Objectives

  • Understand the current national and international legal rules applying to research and research data
  • Know how to apply them to my own data and productions in my research field
  • Be aware of the future trends in laws on research and research data

Content

  • IP rights
  • Data protection and confidential information
  • Challenges for the future

Audience
PhD and post-doc students

 

Speakers

Yaniv Benhamou (Associate Professor of Digital Law at the University of Geneva Law School) specialises in data protection, intellectual property, art law, internet and technology law (including Big Data, Artificial Intelligence and Digital Humanities). He has completed several research stays, including at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University (2018), the Centre for Media and Communications Law (CMCL) (CMCL) at Melbourne Law School (2016) and the Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, Competition and Tax Law in Munich (2006).

Since 2015, ... (more)

Hélène Bruderer holds a Bachelor's degree in law (2012, Lausanne with a stay in Zurich), a Master's degree in law (2014, Fribourg), a Certificate of Specialization in Law (2015, Geneva) and the bar exam (2017, Republic and Canton of Geneva). She completed her legal internship in the public law department of the law firm Lenz & Staehelin.

In parallel to her studies, she worked as an assistant to Professor Pierre Tercier in Fribourg and also completed a three-month internship at the Secretariat of the International Court of Arbitration of the International Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong.
Since May 2017, she has been working as a research and teaching assistant to Professors Jacques de Werra and Philippe Ducor and is writing a PhD thesis on... (more)

 

 

 

From idea to digital dissemination: promoting and disseminating research in words and images (22 April, 6 and 20 May 2021)

Objectives

To popularise scientific research and make it both understandable and attractive on a digital medium for a non-specialist audience is a real challenge for any scientist. This is the challenge of this module. This module will enable doctoral and post-doctoral students to develop an effective textual and visual message to communicate persuasively through digital media and thus share their research, hypotheses, results, opinions with a wide audience.

 

This module consists of three workshops:

  • Workshop 1: Writing for digital media and the general public
  • Workshop 2: Visual communication for digital media
  • Workshop 3: The science of storytelling and storyboarding


Audience
PhD students and post-docs

Duration
4 hours per workshop

 

 

Workshop 1: Writing for digital media and the general public

 

Description

Writing to be read and understood by a wide audience is a headache for researchers, especially on digital media. How to hold attention? How to convey specialized knowledge and complex concepts?

By observing the rules of effective writing, it is possible to solve these questions. At least partially. Let's take a look at some of them: determine your target audience, choose your level of vocabulary, limit the number of words per sentence, use the present tense, find good examples.

This training course is intended to be concrete and offers practical tools that are easy to implement.

Objectives

 

  • To know the rules of effective writing;
  • Know how to title your text/article;
  • Understand the principle of the heading of an article;
  • To understand the expectations of the digital media with regard to scientific texts;
  • Analyse your texts according to Lasswell's proposal: Who says what to whom by what means and with what effect;
  • Practice effective writing.

Content

Theoretical input: writing in a simple way, knowing how the reader understands a text, adopting the rules of effective writing, writing the title and chapeau of an article.

Practical exercises: writing the headline of an article, working on the text/article/summary submitted at registration

Speakers

Jean-Blaise Held, MicroPlume sàrl (http://www.microplume.ch), is an adult trainer and coach in the field of oral and written communication: effective writing, media training, speeches, conducting interviews, public speaking. He was a lecturer at UNIFR from 2004 to 2020 (public relations, journalistic writing, web writing, mediatraining). He teaches written and oral communication at the HEIA Fribourg and for the continuing education of the HEG Fribourg. Mr Held was a journalist at RTS for 20 years and editor in charge of Cahiers protestants (2000-2004).

 

 

 

Workshop 2: Visual communication for digital media

 

Description

The visual communication workshop aims to provide the theoretical knowledge and technical means to create graphic elements in order to communicate messages to a target audience via digital media. Through an alternating presentation of theoretical notions and practical workshops, participants will be led to ask themselves the right questions and to mobilise the best means to achieve their communication objective.

Objectives

 

  • To be able to prepare visual elements for the electronic media
  • Build concise and engaging visuals from complex material
  • Understand the basic codes and registers of graphic expression
  • To know how to create simple graphic compositions

Content

 

  • Basics of graphic design
    • Dimensions, orientation
    • Fills, voids
    • Grid, margins, alignment
    • Colours
    • Typography
  • Graphic composition
    • Consistency
    • Efficiency
    • Register
    • Coherence of the message
  • Recipient of the message
    • Who
    • What, action
    • Notion of time
    • Notion of space
  • Technical constraints (digital world)
    • Image format
    • File size
    • File type
    • Compression
    • Variations

Speaker

Julien Jespersen works at the Division de la formation et des étudiants (DIFE) as a web developer. He has worked as a graphic designer for many years at the Cultural Activities and the Communication Service of the UNIGE. In addition, he teaches layout and illustration courses at the DIFE.

 

 

 

Workshop 3: The science of storytelling and storyboarding

 

Description

There have been great scientists that dropped out of school, but there have been no great scientists that did not tell stories!

I seek to challenge, inspire and train scientists to use narrative techniques and strategies employed in film to produce persuasive presentations, publications and digital media tools. Borrowing communication strategies and techniques from filmmakers and applying them in science communication will help scientists for better communication of their research, and scientists are wise enough to do so!

Objectives

  • Persuasive communication of our research, divulgation and publication
  • Preparing script and storyboard about our research
  • Audio-visual literacy: Better understanding and interpretation of films
  • The use of storytelling in digital media

Content

  • Theory: Story and narrative, storytelling in science, script writing and storyboarding, alternative narrative structures.
  • Practice: Participants re-write their biography, summaries of their already published (or in preparation) papers and presentations based on what they learn in the workshop.

Speaker

Samer Angelone holds PhDs in Film Studies and Biology. He is the founder of the Global Science Film Festival, and works as a jury-member for prestigious international film festivals. Angelone has directed several fiction and documentary films. He teaches 'Filmmaking for Scientists', 'Storytelling & Storyboarding Science', and 'Video-journalism for Scientists' at different universities, research institutes and film festivals. www.sciencefilm.ch

 

Big data foundations accessible to all (young researchers) (March 3, 12, 26 and April 16 2021)

Description
Increasingly, young researchers are generating or accessing large amounts of data – big data – for their research. Learning from these data (“analytics”) allows the acquisition of knowledge (or the interpretation of a research problem) from a set of data. In order to do so in an efficient and scientific manner, researchers must adopt a continuous improvement approach based on problem solving through the application of specific methods, techniques and practices. Once the relevant data required for problem solving identified, the data need to be accessed and can then be explored and analysed. However, it is important that the researchers first visualise the data in order to have a general overview of the data before they proceed with subsequent analyses. The latter can vary greatly depending on the data structure and the researchers’ objectives.

Content

  • Workshop 1: Big data: the basis for solving problems? (Prof Diego Kuonen)
  • Workshop 2: Programming foundations for data analytics (Dr David A. Cucci)
  • Workshop 3: Data visualization (Prof Stéphane Guerrier)
  • Workshop 4: Introduction to regression (Profs Maria-Pia Victoria-Feser and Stéphane Guerrier)

 

 

 

Workshop 1: Big data: the basis for solving problems?

 

Objectives
This first workshop will allow you to conduct a structured reflection on the “veracity and “value of the data even before starting a research project. You will learn the basic elements to define, structure and contextualise a data analysis approach, in order to develop a problem solving strategy, prioritise solutions and implement them. After a theoretical explanation of this continuous improvement approach, a practical application will be carried out in small groups based on case studies brought by you as participant.

Content
- Theoretical introduction: demystification of themes such as big data, the Internet of Things, data analysis approaches (“analytics”), artificial intelligence and the process of continuous improvement applied to data analysis.
- Group work based on case studies provided by the participants.
- Group presentations and discussion.

Speaker

Prof. Dr. Diego Kuonen, CStat PStat, founded Statoo Consulting in 2001 and regularly consults on applying statistical engineering and thinking to big data analytics for businesses and government bodies in Switzerland and across Europe at the operational, tactical and strategic levels. In addition, he is currently Professor of Data Science at the Geneva School of Economics and Management (GSEM) at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and Founding Director of GSEM's new Master of Science in Business Analytics programme. Currently, he is also the Principal Scientific and Strategic Big Data Analytics, Data Innovation and Data Science Advisor for the Directorate and the Board of Management of the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (FSO) in Neuchâtel, Switzerland. He is ranked within several global Big Data, Analytics and Data Science Top 100 Influencers lists, and he is very active on Twitter.

 

 

Workshop 2: Programming foundations for data analytics

 

Objectives

The short course provides essential concepts of the R programming language for developing basic data analysis models. This second workshop will equip you with the basic knowledge of (statistical) programming with R. The R language has come into prominence for its flexibility and efficiency for data analysis. In this workshop, you will learn to exploit different data structures to appropriately manage data, and to manipulate data through different logical operators, control structures and functions. You will also learn to present your data analysis results for reproducible research.

Content

- Introduction to programming in R: data structures, logical operators, control structures and functions.
- Reproducible research: knitr and rmarkdown.

Speaker

Davide A. Cucci received his M.Sc and B.Sc degrees in computer engineering from Politecnico di Milano and a Ph.D. in computer engineering from the same university in 2014. From 2015 to 2019 he has been a post-doc researcher at the Geodetic Engineering Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland. Since 2020, he is a senior research associate at the Data Analytics Lab, University of Geneva, Switzerland. His research interests range from robotics and navigation to computer vision, photogrammetry and sensor stochastic modeling.

 

 

Workshop 3: Data visualization

 

Objectives

This short course presents an introduction to modern tools for data visualization. In the world of Big Data, these tools are essential to analyse massive amounts of data by highlighting useful information such as trends, outliers and patterns in the data. They are inevitable both for the exploratory data analysis and for presentations of the data analysis results to make data-driven decisions. In this workshop, you will learn the key principles, methods and concepts required to visualize data for your purposes of data analysis.

Content

- Discussion on how to choose the correct type of visualization that suits the purpose of data analysis.
- Practices on visualizing data in R.

Speaker

Stéphane Guerrier received M.Sc. and B.Sc. degrees in environmental engineering from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and a Ph.D. degree in statistics from the University of Geneva in 2013. He was an Assistant Professor with the Department of Statistics, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, USA, and the Department of Statistics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA. Since January 2019, he has been an Assistant Professor of Statistics and Data Science with the University of Geneva, financed by the Swiss National Science Foundation “Excellenza Professorial Grant”. His research interests include computational statistics, signal processing, and data analytics.

 

 

 

Workshop 4: Introduction to regression

 

Objectives

This short course is an introduction to linear regression analysis, the first level of Big Data analyses. These models allow relating an outcome to a set of predictors of interest, in a rather flexible manner. Regression models are central to data analysis when the objectives are either prediction or group comparisons, such as the evaluation of treatment effects.  The associated statistical methods (estimation, validation, testing) represent an important aspect of data analysis using regression

Content

This course covers regression analysis, including estimation methods, testing for significance, residual analysis (for model validation) and interpretation of the models.

Speaker

Maria-Pia Victoria-Feser holds a Ph. D. degree in statistics for the University of Geneva. She is professor of statistics at the GSEM, since 2002. Before that, she held a lecturer position in statistics at the London School of Economics, then a “professeur boursier” position at the Faculty of psychology and educational sciences of the University of Geneva.  Her research interests include methodological and computational statistics, with an emphasis put on practical problems in disciplines such as economics, social sciences, psychology and medical sciences (biostatistics). She has held several research grants and published in leading journal in statistics, co-authored a book in biostatistics, and supervised several Ph. D. student that are currently holding professor’s and researcher’s university positions.

Stéphane Guerrier received M.Sc. and B.Sc. degrees in environmental engineering from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and a Ph.D. degree in statistics from the University of Geneva in 2013. He was an Assistant Professor with the Department of Statistics, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, USA, and the Department of Statistics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA. Since January 2019, he has been an Assistant Professor of Statistics and Data Science with the University of Geneva, financed by the Swiss National Science Foundation “Excellenza Professorial Grant”. His research interests include computational statistics, signal processing, and data analytics.

Become a digital researcher ! (March 9 and 19 2021)

Objectives
In this module, after completing your profile, you will discover the articulation between the different networks and digital platforms (Workhop 1). You will learn to work systematically across multiple platforms to create a clear, coherent and consistent digital research space, with an action plan that will enable you to make the best use of digital networks and platforms in order to achieve your professional objectives (Workshop 2).

This module is composed of two workshops that target two concerns of the young researcher: the creation of a professional digital identity and the added value to his/her professional career prospects.

Content

  • Workshop 1: Social networks, collaborative platforms and digital profiling
  • Workshop 2: Your media strategy at the service of your professional ambitions

 

 

Workshop 1: Social networks, collaborative platforms and digital profiling

 

Objectives
For each social media that will be presented you will learn the WHY, the WHAT and the WHO related to the use of each of them. You will define how and when to adopt a specific social media and in which context. You will learn the techniques and best practices to actively maintain your profile(s), efficiently and responsibly, for professional purposes. Moreover, you will learn the principal basis to make an active social media listening about your field and/or group of interest.

Content
- Overview of social networks (Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube...) and collaborative platforms (academia, ResearchGate, ORCiD...).
- Which media should be used, and for what purpose?
- Building a profile and refine your social media presence.
- Best practices.
- Personal monitoring and Social media listening.
- Media skills (responsible communication, ethics, etc.).
- Perspectives, benefits and limits .

Speakers

Anne-Laure Payot holds a master's degree in communication and media from the University of Geneva, which she obtained in 2011. She has several years of experience in communication and journalism, notably at the City of Geneva, the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art of Geneva, and 24heures newspaper. She joined the Communication Office at the University of Geneva in 2013. In parallel with social media management, she worked 6 years at the University’s Press office and contributed to the Journal de l’UNIGE. After completing her training as a social media specialist at SAWI, she became head of social media in the communication department of the University of Geneva.

Massimo Caine completed his studies in molecular biology at the University of Padova (B.Sc) and the Catholic University of Leuven (M.Sc), before continuing his research at the University of Lausanne and then Geneva. In parallel, he developed his media skills and founded TheScienceBreaker, of which he is also the chief editor. After various mandates in communication and public relations at University of Geneva since 2014, he became responsible of the social media management of the Faculty of Science and currently runs TheScienceBreaker with a special focus on PhD students training in fundamental science communication (landscape of science communication and outreach publishing).



 

Workshop 2: Your media strategy at the service of your professional ambitions

 

Objectives
On the basis of your identity(ies) sketched out in the first module, you will also have acquired the skills and work practices to set out an action plan with the aim of putting media networks at the service of your professional ambitions. At the end of the workshop, you will have all the keys in hand to act and interact on social media and collaborative platforms in a coherent way in order to your personal professional goals.

Content
- In the professional development of the researcher, the need to create a clear, coherent and consistent digital research space as a basis for a strong collaborative network
- The tools and work practices required to develop an action plan matching where you are in the research cycle
- The beginnings of a reflection about your professional researcher digital identity.
- The keys to success.
- Advantages and limitations.

Speaker
Maura Hannon trained in Political Economy (BA) at Western University Australia and in Strategy, Marketing, Finance and Economics (MBA) at Curtin University of Technology. For the past 20 years, she has translated and edited reports and works in fields as varied as web service, politics, finance, technology and communication for the private and public sectors. For several years, she has been putting her skills to work for academic institutions, notably CUSO and the University of Lausanne, for which she has been leading workshops on social media and collaborative platforms for young researchers.

From the idea to digital dissemination: promoting and disseminating one's research in words and images October 29, November 12 and 19 2020

Objectives

Popularizing one's scientific research and making it both understandable and attractive on a digital media support for a non-specialist audience is a real challenge for any scientist. Such is the challenge of this module. This module will enable doctoral and post-doctoral students to develop an effective text and visual message to communicate persuasively through digital media and thus share their research, hypotheses, results, opinions with a wide audience.

This module is composed of three workshops:

  • Workshop 1: Writing for Digital Media and the General Public
  • Workshop 2: Visual communication for digital media
  • Workshop 3: The Science of Storytelling and Storyboarding

 


WORKSHOP 1: Writing for Digital Media and the General Public

 

Description
Writing to be read and understood by a wide audience is a puzzle for researchers, especially in digital media. How to get attention? How do you convey sharp knowledge, complex concepts?
By observing the rules of effective writing, it becomes possible to solve these questions. At least partially. Let's look at some of them: determine your target audience, choose your vocabulary level; limit the number of words per sentence; use the present tense of the indicative; find good examples.
This training is intended to be concrete and offers practical tools that are easy to implement.


Objectives

  • Know the rules of efficient writing ;
  • Know how to title your text/article;
  • To understand the principle of the hat of an article;
  • Know the expectations of digital media for scientific texts;
  • Analyze your texts according to Lasswell's proposal: Who says what to whom by what means and with what effect;
  • Practice effective writing.

 

Content
Theoretical contributions: writing in a simple way, knowing how the reader approaches a text, adopting the rules of effective writing, writing the title and caption of an article.
Practical exercises: writing the catchphrases of an article, working on the text/article/abstract that will have been submitted at the time of registration.


Speaker
Jean-Blaise Held, MicroPlume sàrl (http://www.microplume.ch), is an adult trainer and coach in the field of oral and written communication: effective writing, media training, speeches, conducting interviews, public speaking. He was a lecturer at UNIFR from 2004 to 2020 (public relations, journalistic writing, web writing, mediatraining). He teaches written and oral communication at the HEIA Fribourg and for further education at the HEG Fribourg. Mr. Held was a journalist at RTS for 20 years and editor in charge of the Cahiers protestants (2000-2004).




WORKSHOP 2: Visual communication for digital media


Description
The visual communication workshop tends to provide the theoretical knowledge and technical means to realize graphic elements in order to communicate messages to a target audience via digital media. Through an alternation of presentation of theoretical concepts and practical workshops, participants will be led to ask themselves the right questions and mobilize the best means to achieve their communication objective.


Objectives

  • Ability to prepare visual elements for the electronic media
  • Build concise and engaging visual elements from complex material
  • Understand the basics of codes and registers of graphic expression
  • To know how to make simple graphic compositions

 

Content

  • Basics of graphic design
    • Dimensions, orientation
    • Full, empty
    • Grid, margins, alignment
    • Colors
    • Typography
  • Graphic composition
    • Consistency
    • Efficiency
    • Register
    • Consistency of the message
  • Recipient of the message
    • Who
    • What, action
    • Notion of time
    • Notion of space
  • Technical constraints (digital world)
    • Image format
    • File size
    • Type of file
    • Compression
    • Variations


Speaker
Julien Jespersen works at the Division of Training and Students (DIFE) as a web developer. He has worked as a graphic designer for many years at the Cultural Activities and Communication Service of UNIGE. In addition, he runs courses in page layout and illustration within the DIFE.

 

 

WORKSHOP3: Storytelling and storyboarding science

 

Description

There have been great scientists that dropped out of school, but there have been no great scientists that did not tell stories!

I seek to challenge, inspire and train scientists to use narrative techniques and strategies employed in film to produce persuasive presentations, publications and digital media tools. Borrowing communication strategies and techniques from filmmakers and applying them in science communication will help scientists for better communication of their research, and scientists are wise enough to do so!


Objectives

  • Persuasive communication of our research, divulgation and publication
  • Preparing script and storyboard about our research
  • Audio-visual literacy: Better understanding and interpretation of films
  • The use of storytelling in digital media

 

Content

  • Theory: Story and narrative, storytelling in science, script writing and storyboarding, alternative narrative structures.
  • Practice: Participants re-write their biography, summaries of their already published (or in preparation) papers and presentations based on what they learn in the workshop.

 

Speaker

Dr Angelone is a scientist and filmmaker. He teaches “Filmmaking for Scientists”, “Storytelling & Storyboarding Science”, and “Video-journalism for Scientists” at different universities, research institutes and film festivals. He is the founder of the Global Science Film Festival in Switzerland, and works as a jury-member for prestigious film festivals. Angelone has directed several fiction and documentary films. He has developed scientific research on population genetics, diseases, forensics, wildlife conservation, social media, and human-elephant conflict. Angelone holds PhDs in Film Studies and Biology.

 

 

Ethics and Data : a Digital Responsibility issue Octobre 15 2020

Description
Our society has evolved to a point where it is driven by digital services and data. For good or for bad, time will tell, but clearly with no coming back. On that path of digital transition, young researchers must be acutely aware of its responsibility when designing systems, services and doing research. Understanding the underlying implications, principles and how to reason in this new environment is now essential for young researchers.

 

Objectives
This session aims at raising awareness on the increasing responsibility we have as researchers facing the digitization of our society by introducing simple and concrete elements that can be leveraged to assess ethical and social issues in this context of a service and data driven society.

 
Content
After introducing the context and the general concerns, we will introduce a framework for reasoning on ethical and social issues in ICT. Basic principle will be presented and discussed followed by a step by step method to analyze such situations from an ethical and social point of view. Participants will then engage in groupwork to address a concrete situation and present their results to all for discussion. 

 
Speaker
Jean-Henry Morin is associate professor of Information Systems at University of Geneva, Institute of Information Service Science. He is the Director of the bachelor program in Information Systems and Service Science and president of ThinkServices, a Geneva based think(do)tank on Service Science and Innovation, where ThinkData.ch was designed. He was a professor at Korea University Business School, invited professor at Yonsei School of Business and invited researcher at Fasoo.com in South Korea. In 2001 He was a cofounder of a Geneva based company specializing in corporate performance management solutions. His primary research and practice interest is in information security with a particular focus on Digital Rights Management (DRM) in the enterprise sector. His work on Exception Management in DRM environments has been transferred to the industry in partnership with Fasoo.com. This work is within the research area of socially responsible and sustainable security. He also carries out research in blockchain technology, cloud computing, Internet of Things, privacy, data protection, and transparency. His keen interest in Design Thinking as a skill served as a basis for ThinkServices and the creation of an academic FabLab in Geneva. He is the author of a book on digital responsibility (Editions Fyp, 2014) where he suggests the value of informed trust and transparency as the basis of an emerging principle of Co-Compliance (collaborative compliance).

Twitter : @jhmorin

LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/jhmorin/

 

 

Transversal PhD Library Camp Septembre 3 and 8 2020

Objectif
In Module 1, you will learn the best practices in research data management (data organization, storage and sharing, etc.) In Module 2, you will face new challenges related to scientific publication (open access, funder requirements, research evaluation indicators, etc.).

 

 

Module 1 “Managing research data as a junior scientist”
This independent one-day workshop will help you improve your skills in everyday and long term data management, including data organization, storage, sharing and, of course, the FAIR principles. You will learn to comply with the new SNSF requirement concerning the submission of a Data Management Plan (DMP) and have time to start writing your first DMP following this template.

At the end of this module, you will be able to:
-       Apply good practices for the organization and naming of files
-       Value the importance of metadata
-       Apply good practices for the storage of your research data with tools available at UNIGE
-       Value the advantages of depositing your research data in a repository and select it
-       Value the advantages of publishing a data paper
-       Complete a Data Management Plan (DMP) following the SNSF template

 

 

Module 2 “Publishing an article: how to make an informed choice?”

This independent one-day workshop will introduce you in the world of the scientific publication and its “Open Access” side. We will talk about the new challenges and issues in this domain, including the last funding agencies requirements and indicators used to evaluate research. In brief, you will get the keys to perform thoughtful choices for your future publications in order to enhance your scientific career.

 

At the end of this module, you will be able to:
-       Master the scientific publishing process
-       Manage your copyrights as an author
-       Explain the challenges related to Open Access publishing
-       Apply the UNIGE guidelines regarding Open Access
-       Apply the main funding agencies requirements for Open Access publications
-       Enhance your visibility through the creation of an ORCID
-       Find and review the main bibliometric indicators like the Impact factor and the h-index



Dates and place
Thursday 3 (Module 1) and Tuesday 8 September 2020 (Module 2), 9:00-16:30

 

Speakers:
Team members from CODIS

Your media strategy at the service of your professional ambitions June 26 2020

Objectives
On the basis of his or her digital identity(ies) sketched out in the first module, the participant will begin a reflection on the dimensions that will refine his or her digital professional identity towards a coherent unit. He or she will also have developed a strategy and set out an action plan with the aim of putting media networks at the service of his or her professional ambitions. At the end of the workshop, he or she will have all the keys in hand to act and interact on social media and collaborative platforms in a coherent way in order to achieve his or her personal professional goals.

Content

  • The need for the digital collaborative network in the professional development of the researcher.
  • Establish a strategy and develop an action plan.
  • The dimensions to be involved in the development of a digital network: beginning of a reflection
  • The keys to success.
  • Advantages and limitations.

Duration
3 hours

Speaker
Maura Hannon trained in Political Economy (BA) at Western University Australia and in Strategy, Marketing, Finance and Economics (MBA) at Curtin University of Technology. For the past 20 years, she has translated and edited reports and works in fields as varied as web service, politics, finance, technology and communication for the private and public sectors. For several years, she has been putting her skills to work for academic institutions, notably CUSO and the University of Lausanne, for which she has been leading workshops on social media and collaborative platforms for young researchers.

Big data: the basis for solving problems? June 11 2020

Description
Increasingly, young researchers are generating or accessing large amounts of data – big data – for their research. Learning from these data (“analytics”) allows the acquisition of knowledge (or the interpretation of a research problem) from a set of data. In order to do so in an efficient and scientific manner, researchers must adopt a continuous improvement approach based on problem solving through the application of specific methods, techniques and practices.

Objectives
This module will allow researchers to conduct a structured reflection on the “veracity and “value of the data even before starting a research project. He or she will learn the basic elements to define, structure and contextualise a data analysis approach, in order to develop a problem-solving strategy, prioritise solutions and implement them. After a theoretical explanation of this continuous improvement approach, a practical application will be carried out in small groups based on case studies brought by the participants.

Content

  • Theoretical introduction: demystification of themes such as big data, the Internet of Things, data analysis approaches (“analytics”), artificial intelligence and the process of continuous improvement applied to data analysis.
  • Group work based on case studies provided by the participants.
  • Group presentations and discussion.

Duration
3h

Speaker
Prof. Dr. Diego Kuonen, CStat PStat CSci, founded Statoo Consulting in 2001 and regularly consults on applying statistical engineering and thinking to big data analytics for businesses and government bodies in Switzerland and across Europe at the operational, tactical and strategic levels. In addition, he is currently Professor of Data Science at the Geneva School of Economics and Management (GSEM) at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and Founding Director of GSEM's new Master of Science in Business Analytics programme. Currently, he is also the Principal Scientific and Strategic Big Data Analytics and Data Science Advisor for the Directorate and the Board of Management of the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (FSO) in Neuchâtel, Switzerland. He is ranked within several global Big Data, Analytics and Data Science Top 100 Influencers lists, and he is very active on Twitter.

Social networks, collaborative platforms and digital profiling March 6 2020

Objectives
At the end of the workshop, participants will have defined a profile and built their pages (Twitter, LinkedIn, ...). He or she will have grasped the relationships between the various social networks and digital collaboration platforms. He or she will also have the keys to actively maintain his or her page(s), efficiently and responsibly, for professional purposes.

Content

  • Overview of social networks (Twitter, LinkedIn, ...) and collaborative platforms (academia, ResearchGate, ...).
  • Which media should be used, and for what purpose?
  • Building a profile: the steps to follow (depending on the level of the participants).
  • Institutional good practices.
  • Personal (monitoring, ...) and institutional commitment.
  • Media skills (responsible communication, respect for others, etc.).
  • Advantages and limits.

Duration
3 hours

Speakers

Anne-Laure Payot holds a master's degree in communication and media from the University of Geneva, which she obtained in 2011. She has several years of experience in communication and journalism, notably at the City of Geneva, the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art of Geneva, and 24heures newspaper. She joined the Communication Office at the University of Geneva in 2013. In parallel with social media management, she worked 6 years at the University’s Press office and contributed to the Journal de l’UNIGE. After completing her training as a social media specialist at SAWI, she became head of social media in the communication department of the University of Geneva.

Massimo Caine completed his studies in molecular biology at the University of Padova (B.Sc) and the Catholic University of Leuven (M.Sc), before continuing his research at the University of Lausanne and then Geneva. In parallel, he developed his media skills and founded TheScienceBreaker, of which he is also the chief editor. After various mandates in communication and public relations at University of Geneva since 2014, he became responsible of the social media management of the Faculty of Science and currently runs TheScienceBreaker with a special focus on PhD students training in fundamental science communication (landscape of science communication and outreach publishing).