Short course E-Precision Global Health 2018

Information

Period

2 October 2018 - 30 October 2018

Language

English

Contact

Lemlem Girmatsion,
Course Coordinator, Scientific Collaborator,
Institute of Global Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva
+41 22 379 04 39
lemlem.girmatsion(at)unige.ch

Location

Geneva

Registration

Registration deadline

1 October 2018

Fees:

CHF 2'000.- for taking the course for credit (2 ECTS)
CHF 1'400 .- for auditing, SSPH + members

Objectives

Introduce participant to the relevant technologies
Examine the current state of the art in applying those technologies to outbreak prediction and response
Explore where these applications might evolve in the future

Audience

Actor from international organisations, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and foundations based in Geneva or other regional office, as well as professional PhD candidate of the Global Health programme at UNIGE

Programme

Five two-hour lectures broadcast over the web, each of which will take place on Tuesday. Each lecture will focus on a particular topic, bringing experts from data sciences, life sciences, and social sciences together to present and discuss their areas of expertise.

  • 2.10 “Big Data”analytics for outbreak detection and response
  • 9.10 Remote sensing and spatial analysis to map and predict disease outbreaks
  • 16.10 Blockchain and cybersecurity: Data security and privacy during outbreaks
  • 23.10 Modelling epidemics and pandemics– predicting the next outbreak
  • 30.10 mHealth and innovative technologies – mobile technology for outbreak surveillance and detection

Director(s)

Prof. Antoine FLAHAULT, MD, PhD, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Director of the Institute of Global Health, Campus Biotech

Coordinator(s)

Danny SHEATH, Lemlem GIRMATSION, Institute of Global Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva

Partnership

Geneva Health Forum, Precision Epidemic Forecasting, UNI TWIN
e-Precision Global Health

Date(s)

2 October 2018

Speakers

Prof. Kamran KHAN (Toronto med school, Bluedot) Paul LUKOWICZ (DFKI, Germany)

Description

Data is changing. The devices that we use every day are producing and sharing huge volumes of data. This volume, velocity, variety and veracity of data, or “Big Data” represents a key challenge for utility, but also huge opportunities in a diversity of fields, including Global Health. The rise of Big Data and the associated analytics in global health may profoundly change the way we are practicing public and global health. It shows particular promise for monitoring disease outbreaks and informing epidemic preparedness and response. In this session, we will introduce participants to the concept of Big Data and the types of analytical approaches that are used to make sense of this data, including machine learning and artificial intelligence. We will then hear from academics in the fields of life sciences and ethics and decision makers from International Organizations, about how we should use this Big Data to inform epidemic surveillance, preparedness and response and the social and ethical considerations surrounding its collection and use

Date(s)

9 October 2018

Speakers

Nicolas RAY (UINGE) Johanna Gonçalves MARTIN (EPFL)

Description

With nearly 1500 manmade satellites currently orbiting the Earth, the capacity to gather data on surface temperature and weather patterns, as well as capturing high-resolution real-time images, is enormous. Flooding, drought, deforestation, warming and seasonal blooming events are all predictors of a multitude of infectious diseases and can be used to model their spread. Much of this data is freely available, but the challenge is knowing which data are useful and knowing how to use them responsibly. In this session, we will introduce our participants to the key concepts of Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis. We will then hear from experts in the fields of life and social sciences about the variety of remote sensing data we can use to improve epidemic surveillance, preparedness and response, and the social and ethical considerations surrounding its collection and use

Date(s)

16 October 2018

Speakers

Salem AGRAW (Chicago med school) Jean-Pierre HUBAUX (specialist in cybersecurity at EPFL)

Description

If we want to maximise the potential of the remarkable increase in public data available to us, and support the increased digitisation of patient records without doing harm, we must insure the security and reliable accessibility of these records. The Blockchain is a novel, decentralized data management tool that facilitates the secure storage and sharing of diverse data types from multiple sources. Blockchain applications are able to supply “big data” to multiple users, empowering patients, facilitating research and guiding healthcare professionals or health care products (medicines, vaccines, medical devices) to the right person at the right time. In this session, we will introduce our participants to the concept of Blockchains and more broadly to cybersecurity considerations. We will then hear from experts in the fields of life and social sciences about how they are using Blockchain or other similar technologies to improve epidemic preparedness and response as well as the social and ethical considerations surrounding cybersecurity and the collection and sharing of sensitive patient data

Date(s)

23 October 2018

Speakers

David HEYMANN (LSHTM) Isabella ECKERLE (HCUGE) Janne ESTILL ( UNIGE) Bernice ELGER (legal and ethical issues, Unibas and Unige)

Description

Epidemiological modelling is by no means a new field, and neither is its application to Global Health. However, in the past decades we have seen some significant failures in the capacity of mathematical models to accurately predict the occurrence and extent of infectious disease outbreaks. The transdisciplinary approach of Precision Global Health seeks to overcome these failures by fostering the development of more appropriate models that consider real-world variables including human behaviour. In this session, we will introduce our participants to the mathematics behind building complex models and the new tools and approaches available to modellers. We will then hear from experts in the fields of life and social sciences about the types of models they see and use when predicting disease incidence and spread for improved epidemic preparedness and response as well as the social and ethical considerations when designing these models

Date(s)

30 October 2018

Speakers

Valerie D’ ACREMONT (Swiss TPH) Antoine GEISSBUHLER (Unige-HUG) Claire SOMERVILLE (Gender Center, IHIED)

Description

Mobile 4G coupled with huge advances in mobile technology and satellite communication gives us the opportunity to collect and share data faster than ever before, informing real-time disease forecasting models and enabling more timely response to diseases outbreaks. It is not only data that is generated specifically for health purposes which is useful in this context, with seemingly trivial information of potentially high utility, from a range of sources including social media, wireless sensors and mobile connected devices. Unmanned aerial vehicles have made a huge impact to almost every discipline that they have been applied, and their application to global health challenges promises to be no exception. Drones are already being trialled for use in delivering essential medical supplies to remote communities and their potential health applications stretch way beyond this. In this session, we will introduce our participants to the key developments in mHealth and mobile technologies including phones and drones. We will then hear from experts in the fields of life and social sciences about the applications of mHealth mobile devices and how they are applied to improve epidemic surveillance, preparedness and response, as well as the social and ethical considerations

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