Short course Addressing Sexual Violence in Conflict and Emergency Settings 2022

The objective of the course is to provide participants with the skills required to conceive and operationalise a multidisciplinary approach to the prevention and response of sexual violence. This session, residential in Uganda, has a specific focus on East Africa.

Information

Period

28 November 2022 - 2 December 2022
2 ECTS credits
50 Teaching hours
Around 50 hours of work for the whole course, including: • Approximately 20 hours of face-to-face teaching (lectures, debate, group work) • Approximately 30 hours of self-study time (pre-readings, reflexive analysis, case study) A 3-5-page essay for the participants who would like to earn the 2 credits ECTS

Language

English

Format

On-site – switch over to online-learning if required

Contact

Geneva Centre of Humanitarian Studies
+41 (0)22 379 56 50
humanitarianstudies(at)unige.ch

Location

Uganda

Registration

Registration deadline

4 September 2022

Fees:

CHF 1'700 + 650 accommodation costs (total 2,350 CHF).

Deposit: (upon acceptance of admission): CHF 400.-

There is no available scholarship for this programme.

Contribution to the SDGs

Goal 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls Goal 10: Reduce inequality within and among countries Goal 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable Goal 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development

Objectives

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

• Understand the key concepts and basic issues underpinning all forms of sexual violence in conflict and emergency settings
• Conceive an intervention centred on sexual violence victims/survivors’ rights, needs and wishes
• Design activities contributing to sexual violence prevention and risk mitigation.

Audience

Mid-level and senior humanitarian manager currently working directly with victims/survivors of sexual violence, or providing technical advice to or supervision of such programmes
Other participant with relevant experience and expertise may be accepted if space is available
Staff of MSF and ICRC may join for a reduced rate and are asked to apply through their institutional educational programmes

Programme

Structure of the course

  • Core concepts and introduction to a Survivor-Centered Approach
  • Ethics and Methods of Data Gathering
  • Sexual Violence Against Men and Boys
  • Medical Care
  • Mental Health and Psychosocial Support
  • Access to Justice
  • Prevention and Risk Mitigation

Director(s)

Prof. Karl BLANCHET, Geneva Centre of Humanitarian Studies, a joint Centre of the University of Geneva and the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID), Geneva

Coordinator(s)

Laura PASQUERO, Geneva Centre of Humanitarian Studies, Geneva

Partnership

International Committee of the Red Cross • Médecins sans Frontières • Refugee Law Project • UNHCR
The objective of the course is to provide humanitarian mid-level and senior managers with the competencies and skills required to conceive and operationalise a multidisciplinary approach to the prevention and response of sexual violence in conflict and emergency settings. This course session, residential in Uganda, focuses on East Africa and is targeted at participants based or working in the region.

Admission criteria

Admission requirements:

  1. a university qualification (bachelor’s degree or equivalent);
  2. at least three years of relevant professional experience;
  3. excellent command of English;
  4. motivation working in the humanitarian sector.

 

Documents required:

  • CV (Résumé)
  • Scanned copy of passport
  • A passport photo (.jpg format).

 

More information about the admission process is available on our application page.

Number of participants

The number of participants is adapted to the chosen pedagogy.

“I was fortunate enough to be part of this course as we are setting up gender and sexual violence response and prevention activities in Borno state, Nigeria. This has meant that I could already use some of the learnings in the activity design. As a result of the course, we will, for instance, implement more comprehensive support to survivors than previously planned to respond in a more tailor-made way to the needs of each survivor. This course has motivated me to continue seeking ways to improve and extend our programming to support survivors of sexual violence and prevent it from occurring where possible. Within my organisation, sexual violence programming is still marginal compared to other sectors. Still, I intend to advocate internally for increased resource allocation to this often underfunded area and strengthen our organisational capacity.”

Alexander Gnädinger, Programme Manager

The content and the course organisation, as well as the facilitation, were very impressive. Presenters addressed their topics in a very pedagogical way tailored to adult training and learning needs. Sexual violence in conflict settings and emergencies and in times of peace should be seriously considered as it has several negative impacts on the lives of individuals, whether males or females, and on communities. It destroys the social fabric and cohesion of communities. As humanitarian workers, we need to be aware of that and anticipate that sexual violence might happen anywhere and anytime. I was very satisfied with the training. This is an essential course that should be offered to all humanitarian actors, not only those working specifically on Sexual violence.

Marietou Dia, Sexual Violence Regional Advisor for Africa, ICRC

Having facilitators who are experts in the field, not only in knowledge but also in practice, was key to my learning.

Course participant

The course was an eye-opener. I interacted with so many practitioners, which was important because we [researchers] make policy recommendations and must interact meaningfully with those actors who interact routinely with survivors. We often do not have these engagements. I would definitely recommend this course to researchers on sexual violence in humanitarian settings.

 

Contribution to the SDGs

Goal 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls Goal 10: Reduce inequality within and among countries Goal 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable Goal 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development

Les termes utilisés pour désigner des personnes sont pris au sens générique; ils ont à la fois la valeur d'un masculin et d'un féminin.