Ultrafast Time-Division Demultiplexing of Polarization-Entangled Photons

Authors:John M Donohue, Jonathan Lavoie, Kevin J Resch
Journal:Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 163602 (2014)
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.163602
Abstract:Maximizing the information transmission rate through quantum channels is essential for practical implementation of quantum communication. Time-division multiplexing is an approach for which the ultimate rate requires the ability to manipulate and detect single photons on ultrafast time scales while preserving their quantum correlations. Here we demonstrate the demultiplexing of a train of pulsed single photons using time-to-frequency conversion while preserving their polarization entanglement with a partner photon. Our technique converts a pulse train with 2.69 ps spacing to a frequency comb with 307 GHz spacing which may be resolved using diffraction techniques. Our work enables ultrafast multiplexing of quantum information with commercially available single-photon detectors.
File:donohue2014a.pdf

BibTeX Source

@article{PhysRevLett.113.163602,
  title = {Ultrafast Time-Division Demultiplexing of Polarization-Entangled Photons},
  author = {Donohue, John M. and Lavoie, Jonathan and Resch, Kevin J.},
  journal = {Phys. Rev. Lett.},
  volume = {113},
  issue = {16},
  pages = {163602},
  numpages = {5},
  year = {2014},
  month = {Oct},
  publisher = {American Physical Society},
  doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.163602},
  url = {http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.163602},
 abstract= {Maximizing the information transmission rate through quantum channels is essential for practical implementation of quantum communication. Time-division multiplexing is an approach for which the ultimate rate requires the ability to manipulate and detect single photons on ultrafast time scales while preserving their quantum correlations. Here we demonstrate the demultiplexing of a train of pulsed single photons using time-to-frequency conversion while preserving their polarization entanglement with a partner photon. Our technique converts a pulse train with 2.69 ps spacing to a frequency comb with 307 GHz spacing which may be resolved using diffraction techniques. Our work enables ultrafast multiplexing of quantum information with commercially available single-photon detectors.}
}