Evénements

Séminaires passés 2020

DEC 22 2020

Présentation annuelle du département PHYM par le Prof. Michelangelo Foti

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Pr. Michelangelo Foti

 

From OMICS to diabetes management

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Cécilia JIMENEZ-SANCHEZ, laboratoire du Pr. Pierre MAECHLER

Résumé: Diabetes is a serious metabolic disorder characterized by defects in beta-cell function and mass in the pancreas. Identification of individuals who have lost part of their beta-cell mass is essential for its prevention, but technically impossible for now. A potential biomarker of beta-cell mass that might allow to identify those individuals who are at high-risk of developing diabetes but yet asymptomatic has been recently highlighted by researchers from Prof. Pierre MAECHLER laboratory. Cecilia JIMENEZ-SANCHEZ in collaboration with other members of the laboratory is trying to validate its use as indicator of beta-cell mass ahead of diabetes onset in humans.

 

DEC 15 2020

GNAO1-Dependent Pediatric Encephalopathies: from protein biochemistry to animal model

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Alexey KOVAL, laboratoire du Pr. Vladimir KATANAEV

Résumé: -

 

Biological and medical data deluge: challenges and opportunities for faster discoveries and deeper understanding of biological systems

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Noushin HADADI, laboratoire du Pr. Mirko TRAJKOVSKI

Résumé: The growing technology availability combined with their decreasing cost has led to a deluge of biological and medical data. Noushin HADADI in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Mirko TRAJKOVSKI laboratory presented, with the help of two case-studies about thermal adaptation, the challenges and opportunities that storing, but also curating and analyzing these data represents.

 

 

DEC 8 2020

CFTR modulates Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGTPases activator) mRNA stability

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Mehdi BADAOUI, laboratoire du Pr. Marc CHANSON

Résumé: Chronic lung infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of respiratory failure in people with cystic fibrosis. Mehdi BADAOUI in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Marc CHANSON laboratory discovered that overexpression of Vav3 (a guanine exchange factor) promotes these infections by creating bacterial docking stations on airways’ surface. He now explores whether Vav3 overexpression is due to an increase of its mRNA stability caused by enhanced interaction with the RNA-binding protein HuR.

 

PQN-59 and GTBP-1 involvement in stress induced cytoplasmic granules in C. elegans embryos

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Alexandra BONDAZ, laboratoire de la Pre. Monica GOTTA

Résumé: When exposed to stress, cells react by forming stress granules, a mechanism still poorly understood. Alexandra BONDAZ in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Monica GOTTA laboratory is investigating if two proteins, PQN-59 and GTBP-1, contribute to stress granule assembly in C. elegans embryos.

 

DEC 1 2020

Networks of lipid transfer proteins controlling lipid homeostasis in a changing environment

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Larissa VAN EK, laboratoire de la Pr. Anne-Claude GAVIN

Résumé: The maintenance of a balanced composition of lipids in membranes is important for many cell functions and a dysregulation of this equilibrium is involved in many diseases ranging from obesity to Alzheimer’s disease. Lipid transfer proteins play an essential role in this process. Larissa VAN EK in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Anne-Claude GAVIN laboratory explores the mechanism of action of these proteins and their regulation.

 

Nanobodies to Sense and Modulate Opioid Receptor Function

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Zoé VALBRET, laboratoire de la Pre. Miriam STOEBER

Résumé: Opioids are highly efficient in relieving pain. However, they are highly addictive and can provoke harmful side-effects. Understanding better the signaling pathways of G protein-coupled receptors targeted by opioids might help developing safer medications for pain management. Zoé VALBRET in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Miriam STOEBER’s laboratory is studying the signaling pathways of opioid receptors with specifically developed nanobodies.

 

NOV 24 2020

Renal glucose metabolism and chronic kidney disease

Lieu: par Zoom

Intervenant: Thomas VERISSIMO, laboratoire de la Pr. Sophie DE SEIGNEUX

Résumé: Chronic kidney disease affects about 10% of the adult population. Understanding how glucose metabolism is modified is a key issue to develop new strategies for the treatment of this disease.
Thomas VERISSIMO in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Sophie DE SEIGNEUX laboratory studies the role of different key enzymes in kidney glucose metabolism and its link with kidney failure, in the context of chronic kidney disease.

 

ANNULE - Precision diabetes in paediatrics: screening of molecular and functional effects of new gene variants

Lieu: par Zoom

Intervenant: Rodolphe DUSAULCY, laboratoire du Pr. Valérie SCHWITZGEBEL

Résumé: -

 

NOV 17 2020 - ANNULÉ

Visualizing cellular lipids with shotgun mass spectrometry

Lieu: par Zoom uniquement, sur inscription

Intervenant: Kenji MAEDA, Cell death and Metabolism unit, Danish Cancer Society Research Center (Danemark)

Résumé: -

 

NOV 10 2020

Microbiomes of mice and men

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Silas KIESER, laboratoire du Pr. Mirko TRAJKOVSKI

Résumé: -

 

Frizzled-7 antagonists against triple negative breast cancer

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Cédric BOUDOU, laboratoire du Pr. Vladimir KATANAEV

Résumé: Triple negative breast cancer is a very deadly cancer with still limited therapies. In this cancer, Wnt signaling pathway is dysregulated and finding agents targeting this pathway may improve therapeutical approaches. Cédric BOUDOU in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Vladimir KATANAEV is iteratively designing small molecules that can selectively target the upstream part of this pathway and provide new treatment options.

 

NOV 3 2020

Towards the development of a better therapeutic for type-1 diabetes

Lieu: via Zoom uniquement

Intervenant: Giorgio RAMADORI, laboratoire du Pr. Roberto COPPARI

Résumé: After decades of research on diabetes, insulin deficiency remains a great medical and societal challenge. The role of a protein called S100A9 in insulin deficiency has been recently highlighted by researchers from Prof. Roberto COPPARI laboratory. Giorgio RAMADORI in collaboration with other members of the laboratory explores the mechanism of action of S100A9 with murine models. These experiments confirmed the anti-diabetic action of this protein and its potential as a therapeutical target.

 

Hv1 proton channel, an innovative therapeutic target to treat cancer

Lieu: via Zoom uniquement

Intervenant: Antoine CHEMALY, laboratoire du Pr. Nicolas DEMAUREX

Résumé: Hv1 proton channel is mainly expressed in immune cells and more surprisingly in highly metastatic tumors. Indeed, there is a growing evidence that Hv1 promotes tumor growth and drugs inhibiting Hv1 are a potential therapeutic target. Antoine CHEMALY in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Nicolas DEMAUREX laboratory is searching for a potential Hv1 inhibitor through a complex screening cascade, starting with high throughput screening and ending with the identification of candidate molecules for clinical development.

 

OCT 27 2020

Effects of dietary potassium intake on kidney fibrosis

Lieu: uniquement par Zoom

Intervenant: Valérie OLIVIER, laboratoire du Pr. Eric FERAILLE

Résumé: Chronic kidney disease is a growing global health concern with few therapeutic options. This severe disease leads to renal fibrosis and loss of renal function. Valérie OLIVIER in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Eric FERAILLE laboratory is exploring the opportunity to use food as medicine. Their recent experiments led to a better understanding of the effects of potassium intake on kidney fibrosis.

 

Control of stem cell fate by targeting metabolic pathways

Lieu: uniquement par Zoom

Intervenant: Alexandre PROLA, laboratoire de la Pre Perrine CASTETS

Résumé: Adult stem cells are essential for the regeneration and the maintenance of tissue function, but their metabolism is not fully understood. Alexandra PROLA in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Perrine CASTETS laboratory is exploring the metabolism of adult muscle stem cells. With a novel methodology, they identified some of the mechanisms governing their metabolism, opening new avenues to enhance their regenerative capacities.

 

OCT 20 2020

How to make the animal mitotic spindle asymmetric

Lieu: uniquement par Zoom

Intervenant: Ennio SILVESTRI, laboratoire du Pr. Patrick MERALDI

Résumé: Mitosis is the event to faithfully segregate chromosome in two daughter cells. Its deregulation may cause cancer progression. Ennio SILVESTRI under the supervision of Prof. Patrick MERALDI is exploring the role that microtubules and their regulators play on the cell division symmetry. They developed a promising imaging technique to control the exact localization of these regulators.

 

The role of lipid transfer proteins in the integration of metabolism

Lieu: uniquement par Zoom

Intervenant: Kevin TITECA, laboratoire de la Pre. Anne-Claude GAVIN

Résumé: -

 

OCT 6 2020

Protein localisation in the Golgi apparatus

Lieu: Auditoire Reverdin (B02.2526)

Intervenant: Claudie BIAN, laboratoire du Pr. Pierre COSSON

Résumé: Recombinant proteins are used to treat a variety of diseases, and it is a key element to control their degree of glycosylation. Claudie BIAN in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Pierre COSSON’s laboratory is trying to determine how glycosylation enzymes are localized in the Golgi apparatus and notably how the degree of hydrophobicity of the part of the protein inserted into the membrane plays a role in its localization.

 

Molecular heterogeneity of human myogenic reserve cells

Lieu: Auditoire Reverdin (B02.2526)

Intervenant: Axelle BOUCHE, laboratoire du Pr. Didier HANNOUCHE

Résumé: Skeletal muscle injuries can stem from a variety of events, including direct trauma and degenerative diseases. Despite their clinical importance, optimal therapeutic strategies are still not well defined. Axelle BOUCHE in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Didier HANNOUCHE’s laboratory is exploring the therapeutic potential of myogenic reserve cells in skeletal muscle regeneration.

 

OCT 1 2020

Super-resolution imaging of mitochondrial dynamics

Lieu: sur inscription

Intervenant: Tatjana KLEELE, EPFL, invitée par le Prof. Nicolas DEMAUREX

Résumé: Mitochondrial fission is a highly regulated process which, when disrupted, can alter metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis. The downstream effects have implications for a broad range of diseases, from neurodegeneration to cardiovascular disease and cancer. Despite a universal molecular machinery, the outcome of fission can be divers: biogenesis of new mitochondria to maintain the mitochondrial population, but also dissociation of dysfunctional mitochondria, which undergo mitophagy. Therefore, the question arises how the fission machinery is accounting for those opposing function and whether there is a distinct regulation. Due to their small size, the dynamics of mitochondria and their interaction partners are hard to study at the single organelle level.

Tatjana Kleele uses live-cell super-resolution microscopy (SIM, iSIM) for fast multi-colour acquisition of mitochondrial dynamics in Cos-7 cells and mouse cardiomyocytes. She analysed hundreds of fission events, to resolve if division leading to proliferation is differently regulated than fission leading to mitophagy. She found of two functionally and mechanistically distinct types of fission: Mitochondria divide asymmetrically to evacuate damaged material into a smaller daughter mitochondrion that subsequently undergoes mitophagy, whereas healthy mitochondria proliferate via symmetric division.

 

SEPT 29 2020

The Golgi as a GPCR signaling hub

Lieu: Auditoire Reverdin (B02.2526)

Intervenant: Arthur RADOUX, laboratoire de la Pre. Miriam STOEBER

Résumé: Opioid receptors are important in pain regulation and are the most targeted receptors for pain relief. These opioid drugs have strong side-effects, urging for the need of new drugs. Arthur RADOUX in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Miriam STOEBER’s laboratory is trying to determine if the Golgi system plays a role in the response to opioid drugs.

 

Metabolic mapping: impact of protein intake and glutamate dehydrogenase activity in liver and kidney

Lieu: Auditoire Reverdin (B02.2526)

Intervenant: Yan ZHOU, laboratoire du Pr. Pierre MAECHLER

Résumé: Ammonia is a waste product of protein consumption that is detoxified by the glutamate dehydrogenase GDH. This function is crucial for human physiology as an excess of ammonia in the blood can contribute to neurological disorders. Yan ZHOU in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Pierre MAECHLER’s laboratory has established a new method of in situ metabolic mapping which allowed them to study the impact of protein intake on GDH activity in different organs.

 

SEPT 22 2020

Role of UBAP2L in stress granule dynamics and cell division

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Meghana DINESH KUMAR, laboratoire de la Pre Monica GOTTA

Résumé: Environmental stress causes cells to form aggregates called stress granules. Understanding how these granules form is of great interest, as they are associated with some neurodegenerative diseases and cancers. Meghana DINESH KUMAR in collaboration with the other researchers from Monica GOTTA’s laboratory is investigating the role of the protein UBAP2L in stress granule dynamics, but also if this protein might have other functions in cell division.

 

Novel miRNA-oncogene axis in hepatocarcinogenesis

Lieu: via Zoom

Intervenant: Monika GJORGJIEVA, laboratoire du Pr. Michelangelo FOTI

Résumé: -

 

SEPT 15 2020

A system biology approach to define the role of macrophages in the regulation of metabolism beyond inflammation

Lieu: Zoom, sur inscription

Intervenant: Dr Myriam AOUADI, Integrated Cardio Metabolic Centre, Karolinska Institutet (Suède)

Résumé: Her research group studies macrophage subpopulations and their function in obesity-associated metabolic complications. These investigations should give valuable evidence for understanding the contribution of these immune cells to metabolic diseases. For more details, see her website.

 

SEPT 8 2020

Visceral fat browning by cold exposure of microbiota-depleted mice

Lieu: Auditoire Boymond (B02.2226), et via Zoom

Intervenant: Jing XUE, laboratoire du Pr. Mirko TRAJKOVSKI

Résumé: Adipose tissue browning is a rising therapeutic strategy in the context of obesity. Jing XUE in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Mirko TRAJKOVSKI laboratory is exploring the opportunity to target visceral white fat to reduce adiposity and induce browning. Their recent experiments are promising and bring to light new pathways involved in adipose tissue browning.

 

 

Development of Drosophila model system for studying mechanisms of GNAO-related human epileptic disorder

Lieu: Auditoire Boymond (B02.2226), et via Zoom

Intervenant: Mikhail SAVITSKIY, laboratoire du Pr. Vladimir KATANAEV

Résumé: Epilepsy affects more than 50 million people worldwide and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) might play an important role in this neurological disorder. Mikhail SAVITSKIY in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Vladimir KATANAEV laboratory is developing new fly models of epilepsy to understand the role of Gαo, a particular subunit of G protein, in epileptic disorder.

 

SEPT 1 2020

Identification of alternative approaches for improving management of insulin deficiency

Lieu: Auditoire Reverdin (B02.2526), et via Zoom

Intervenant: Serena RICCI, laboratoire du Pr. Roberto COPPARI

Résumé: Despite decades of research on diabetes, insulin deficiency remains a great medical and societal challenge. Serena RICCI in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Roberto COPPARI laboratory is exploring the role of the protein S100A9 and the hormone leptin in improving metabolism in type 1 diabetes by using with murine models. Their recent experiments give promising results and might pave the way to alternative therapies.

 

The core clock transcription factor BMAL1 drives circadian β-cell proliferation during compensatory regeneration of the endocrine pancreas

Lieu: Auditoire Reverdin (B02.2526), et via Zoom

Intervenant: Volodymyr PETRENKO, laboratoire de la Dre. Charna DIBNER

Résumé: The day and night alternation influences many physiological processes. When dysregulated, these internal clocks can promote metabolic diseases such as diabetes. Volodymyr PETRENKO in collaboration with other researchers from Dr. Charna DIBNER laboratory explores the impact of these clocks on pancreatic β-cells, which are known to play a key role in diabetes progression. Their recent experiments demonstrated that, in pancreatic β-cells, the expression of many genes is under the control of internal clocks.

 

AOÛT 25 2020

Message de bienvenue du directeur du département

Lieu: Auditoire Reverdin (B02.2526)

Intervenant: Pr. Michelangelo FOTI

 

Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) lipidation in Alzheimer disease

Lieu: Auditoire Reverdin (B02.2526)

Intervenant: Karina LINDNER, laboratoire de la Pre Anne-Claude GAVIN

Résumé: Alzheimer disease is a disease leading to irreversible brain damages. If the importance of lipids in the progression of the disease is recognized, the exact molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Karina LINDNER in collaboration with the other researchers from Prof. Anne-Claude GAVIN laboratory is exploring the lipid transporter role of Apolipoprotein E in the evolution of Alzheimer disease.

 

JUIN 23 2020

Decoding the subcellular compartmentalization of Gαo

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Gonzalo SOLIS, Pr. Vladimir KATANAEV laboratory

Résumé: G protein-coupled receptors are membrane receptors regulating an incredible range of body functions. For signalling, they utilize signal transducers called G proteins. The mechanism of action of one G protein subunit, Gαo, remains unclear. Gonzalo SOLIS in collaboration with other researchers from Vladimir KATANAEV laboratory explores what drives Gαo localization within cells and how this subunit associates with membranes.

 

Impaired Proteostasis in skeletal muscle pathophysiology: the case of X-linked Myopathy with Excessive Autophagy (XMEA)

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Pr. Perrine CASTETS

Résumé: More than a third of our body mass consists of skeletal muscle. Maintaining a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation is essential for muscle integrity. With her newly established group, Perrine CASTETS is studying the underlying mechanisms of muscle diseases due to impaired protein balance. In one of her current projects, she investigates the role of the protein VMA21 in a rare myopathy called XMEA.

 

JUIN 16 2020

Extracellular killing of P. aeruginosa by D. discoideum

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Imen AYADI, Pr. Pierre COSSON laboratory

Résumé: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium known for its antibiotic resistance and responsible of severe infections. Understanding by which exact mechanisms it can be kill might help to develop new therapeutic strategies. Imen AYADI in collaboration with other researchers from Pierre COSSON laboratory highlighted with Dictyostelium discoideum as a model that P. aeruginosa can be killed extracellularly and presented first insights on the mechanisms involved.

 

Computational modelling of PLK-1 dynamics and gradient formation in C. elegans embryos

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Sofia BARBIERI, Pr. Monica GOTTA laboratory

Résumé: Molecular gradients are crucial to transmit spatial information within single cells, but their formation is a complex process still poorly understood. Sofia BARBIERI in collaboration with other researchers from Monica GOTTA laboratory studies the formation of gradients in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Using innovative mathematical modelling tools, they disentangle the interactions between different proteins in gradient formation.

 

JUIN 9 2020

Interaction between Epithelial Sodium Channel γ-Subunit and Claudin-8 Modulates Paracellular Sodium Permeability in Renal Collecting Duct

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Ali SASSI, Pr. Eric FERAILLE laboratory

Résumé: Sodium is required to maintain normal blood pressure and kidneys play a key role in sodium homeostasis. Sodium reabsorption occurs in the renal collecting duct, through two different pathways: across cells through epithelial sodium channels and between cells through tight junctions. Ali SASSI in collaboration with other researchers from Eric FERAILLE laboratory showed that tight junctions are regulated upon physiological needs and coordinated with epithelial sodium channels.

 

Uncovering how delayed DNA replication in cancer cells impairs centrosome structure/function

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Devashish DWIVEDI, Pr. Patrick MERALDI laboratory

Résumé: Cell division is a process tightly coordinated in time. DNA replication stress alters the timing of cell division and is a hallmark of many types of cancers. Devashish DWIVEDI in collaboration with the other researchers from Patrick MERALDI laboratory conducts microscopy experiments to determine the role of delayed DNA replication in regulating the activity of key players of the cell and centrosome cycle.

 

JUIN 2 2020

How drugs interact with our bugs

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Pr. Kiran PATIL, EMBL, Heidelberg (Allemagne)

Résumé: Drugs have an important influence on gut microbiota, but the exact mechanisms of drug-bacteria interactions remain largely unknown. Kiran PATIL from the EMBL Heidelberg investigates the drug-bug interaction landscape with mathematical models, in vitro experiments and invertebrate models. These analyses revealed new drug-bug interactions which might be relevant for drug efficacy.

 

MAI 26 2020

Identifying new molecular targets for the treatment of Insulin Deficiency

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Gloria URSINO, Pr. Roberto COPPARI laboratory

Résumé: After decades of research on diabetes, treatments of insulin deficiency remain unsatisfactory. Gloria URSINO in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Roberto COPPARI laboratory explores the role of the protein S100A9 in insulin deficiency with murine models. These experiments showed that S100A9 ameliorates insulin deficiency symptoms and thereby may become a therapeutical target.

 

Role of NFATs in the differentiation/self-renewal of human myoblasts

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Stéphane KONIG, Dr. Maud FRIEDEN laboratory

Résumé: Skeletal muscle regeneration is an essential process where calcium signalling plays a crucial role. Stéphane KONIG in collaboration with the other researchers from Maud FRIEDEN laboratory conducts in vitro experiments to determine the role of calcium signaling and NFAT transcription factors in muscle regeneration.

 

MAI 19 2020

Role of the gut microbiota in metabolism and osteoporosis

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Melis COLAKOGLU, Pr. Mirko TRAJKOVSKI laboratory

Résumé: Osteoporosis is a disease in which bones become brittle because of a dysregulated balance between bone resorption and bone formation, eventually causing bone loss. Understanding better how warm exposure influences osteoporosis and metabolism can provide new therapeutic applications to keep this balance. Melis COLAKOGLU together with the other researchers from Mirko TRAJKOVSKI’s laboratory explores the role of both warm exposure and gut microbiota on bone.

 

UNC93B1: An ER chaperone modulator of STIM and TLR signaling

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Jennifer Wen-An WANG, Pr. Nicolas DEMAUREX laboratory

Résumé: Calcium is important for many cellular processes and responses. The function of immune cells is regulated by calcium signaling, but all exact mechanisms are still unknown. Jennifer Wen-An WANG in collaboration with the other researchers from Nicolas DEMAUREX laboratory explores the role of the protein UNC93B1 in calcium signaling and immune responses.

 

MAI 12 2020

CFTR and signaling pathways in differentiation towards a functional airway epithelium

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Tahir IDRIS, Pr. Marc CHANSON laboratory

Résumé: Cystic fibrosis is a severe genetic disease affecting airway epithelium. Understanding better airway epithelium repair process might provide new therapeutic issues. Tahir IDRIS together with the other researchers from Marc CHANSON’s laboratory explores the contribution of several signaling pathways in the proliferation and differentiation of the airway epithelium.

 

Control of endothelial barrier function by modulation of integrin beta-1

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Adama SIDIBE, Pr. Bernhard WEHRLE-HALLER laboratory

Résumé: Endothelium physically separates blood from surrounding tissue and its permeability increases in case of chronic inflammation. Integrins are involved in these permeability changes, but the exact mechanisms remain unknown. Adama SIDIBE in collaboration with the other researchers from Bernhard WEHRLE-HALLER laboratory explores the role of integrin β1 acetylation in endothelium permeability.

MAI 5 2020

Store-Operated Calcium Entry: what is its role during Excitation-Contraction Coupling?

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Jessica BRUNETTI, Dr. Maud FRIEDEN laboratory

Résumé: Excitation - contraction coupling is the sequence of events through which nerves stimulate skeletal muscles causing their contraction. Calcium equilibrium is essential in this process. Jessica BRUNETTI together with the other researchers from Maud FRIEDEN’s laboratory explores the exact contribution of the store operated calcium entry (SOCE) pathway during excitation - contraction coupling

 

 

Golgi-resident Gαo as part of an alternative heterotrimer

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Jana VALNOHOVA, Pr. Vladimir KATANAEV laboratory

Résumé: G protein-coupled receptors are membrane receptors regulating an incredible range of body functions. For signalling, they utilize signal transducers called G proteins. The mechanism of action of one G protein subunit, Gαo, remains unclear. Jana VALNOHOVA in collaboration with the other researchers from Vladimir KATANAEV laboratory explores with which proteins Gαo interacts in Golgi and what is the mechanism of Gαo activation.

 

Cold exposure protects from neuroinflammation through immunologic reprogramming

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Martina SPILJAR, Pr. Mirko TRAJKOVSKI laboratory

Résumé: Cold exposure affects the immune system. Understanding its impact on neuroinflammation may open new therapeutic avenues for neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Martina SPILJAR in collaboration with the other researchers from Mirko TRAJKOVSKI’s laboratory and from Doron MERKLER’s laboratory explores how cold exposure reduces neuroinflammation and which immune cells are involved in this process.

AVRIL 28 2020

miR-149 in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Marta CORREIA DE SOUSA, Pr. Michelangelo FOTI laboratory

Résumé: Fatty liver disease is an alarming health issue due to the increasing sedentary lifestyle and obesity. Short non-coding RNAs, called microRNAs, might participate in the development of fatty liver disease and its progression towards liver cancer. Marta CORREIA DE SOUSA together with other researchers from Michelangelo FOTI’s laboratory demonstrated the role of a particular microRNA, miRNA-149, in hepatic metabolism and highlighted its regulation by both diet and physical activity.

 

A new family of bacteriolytic proteins in Dictyostelids

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Cyril GUILHEN, Pr. Pierre COSSON laboratory

Résumé: Understanding how cells kill bacteria is a key issue to develop new strategies for the prevention and treatment of infectious and immune-mediated diseases. Cyril GUILHEN in collaboration with the other researchers from Pierre COSSON’s laboratory is searching for the exact molecular mechanisms of bacterial degradation. With a unicellular model called Dictyostelium discoideum, they discovered a new family of proteins involved in bacterial degradation.

 

β3 integrin-dependent recruitment and binding of paxillin to focal adhesions

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Marta RIPAMONTI, Pr. Bernhard WEHRLE-HALLER laboratory

Résumé: Focal adhesions are large and complex protein platforms connecting cells with the extracellular matrix. They play an essential role in both cell proliferation and cell communication. Marta RIPAMONTI in collaboration with the other researchers from Bernhard WEHRLE-HALLER’s laboratory is investigating the interaction of an adaptor protein called paxillin with focal adhesions.

AVRIL 21 2020

Stress granules and development: exploring the link

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Simona ABBATEMARCO, Pr. Monica GOTTA laboratory

Résumé: Stress induces in cells the formation of aggregates called stress granules. Understanding how these granules form is of great interest, as they are associated with some neurodegenerative diseases and cancers. Simona ABBATEMARCO in collaboration with the other researchers from Monica GOTTA’s laboratory is investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of stress granules.

FKBP10 Regulates Protein Translation to Sustain Lung Cancer Growth

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Raquel FIRNKES, Pr. Roberto COPPARI laboratory

Résumé: The protein FKBP10 has been recently highlighted as a promising therapeutic target against lung cancer by the laboratory of Roberto COPPARI. Raquel FIRNKES in collaboration with the other researchers from this team is now investigating the exact molecular mechanisms of action of FKBP10.

AUBPs in hepatic carcinogenesis

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Cyril SOBOLEWSKI, Pr. Michelangelo FOTI laboratory

Résumé: -

AVRIL 14 2020

Integrins and TGFb activation

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Michael BACHMANN, Pr. Bernhard WEHRLE-HALLER laboratory

Résumé: Understanding better the activation of TGFβ by integrins might help to fight severe diseases such as cancers and autoimmune diseases. Michaël BACHMANN in collaboration with the other researchers from Bernhard WEHRLE-HALLER’s laboratory is investigating how different isoforms of TGFβ are activated. With in vitro experiments, they are exploring the different combinations of integrins and TGFβ in this process.

Development of drug candidate clofazimine against triple-negative breast cancer

Lieu: Zoom

Intervenant: Jiabin XU, Pr. Vladimir KATANAEV laboratory

Résumé: Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling pathway leads to many cancers. In the case of a highly morbid cancer, the triple-negative breast cancer, drug repurposing may allow to discover new therapeutic options based on existing drugs. Jiabin XU in collaboration with other researchers from Vladimir KATANAEV’s laboratory explores the potential of a promising drug, clofazimine. Researchers confirmed anti-cancer properties of clofazimine in different cell lines and are now identifying which target(s) of Wnt signaling pathway might be involved.

MARS 10 2020

Transcriptional response of opioid receptor signaling with subcellular resolution

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Lucie OBERHAUSER, Pr. Miriam STOEBER laboratory

Résumé: Opioids are highly efficient in relieving pain. However, they are highly addictive and prolonged exposure can lead to severe health issues and death. Understanding better the signaling pathways of G protein-coupled receptors targeted by opioids might help developing safer medications for pain management. Lucie OBERHAUSER in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Miriam STOEBER’s laboratory is studying the global transcriptional response of opioid receptor signaling and the impact of receptors’ localization on their response.

Do amoeba discriminate between different bacteria?

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Otmane LAMRABET, Pr. Pierre COSSON laboratory

Résumé: Understanding better the mechanisms of bacterial recognition by hosts might help to fight infectious diseases. Otmane LAMRABET in collaboration with the other researchers from Prof. Pierre COSSON laboratory is investigating how a unicellular model called Dictyostelium discoideum identifies different bacteria. Their experiments highlighted interesting candidate genes potentially implicated in bacterial recognition.

MARS 3 2020

WDR62 and its function in mitosis

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Amanda GUERREIRO, Pr. Patrick MERALDI laboratory

Résumé: Understanding cell division is a key issue to overcome primary microcephaly, a genetic disorder resulting in impaired brain development. Amanda GUERREIRO in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Patrick MERALDI’s group is exploring the function of WDR62, a cell-cycle dependent protein. Their experiments reveal its importance for microtubule stability and chromosome segregation.

Extracellular ATP signalling as a fructose-sensitive modulator of pancreatic beta-cells

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Thierry BRUN, Pr. Pierre MAECHLER laboratory

Résumé: Fructose is a widely used artificial sweetener which is associated with the increase of obesity and diabetes. Dr. Thierry BRUN in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Pierre MAECHLER’s laboratory is exploring the effect of chronic fructose on beta-cells from the pancreas. The  experiments reveal that chronic fructose potentiates glucose-stimulated  insulin secretion by beta-cells, through an extracellular ATP signalling pathway.

FÉVRIER 25 2020

Leverage the mouse microbiome to improve pre-clinical research

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Silas KIESER, Pr. Mirko TRAJKOVSKI laboratory

Résumé: Gut microbiome symbiotically affects the functioning of our organism and might provide a novel treatment target in many chronic diseases, such as obesity and gastrointestinal disorders. Silas KIESER in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Mirko TRAJKOVSKI’s group identified hundreds of new species and subspecies present in mouse microbiome, raising the mapped proportion of the microbiome to more than 90%.

Tristetraprolin promotes hepatic inflammation and tumor initiation but restrains cancer progression to malignancy

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Dobrochna DOLICKA, Pr. Michelangelo FOTI laboratory

Résumé: Fatty liver disease is a rising health issue which can lead to the development of cancer. Non-genomic alterations of gene expression, such as AU-rich elements-binding proteins (AUBPs), might participate in the progression of these diseases. Dobrochna DOLICKA together with other researchers from Prof. Michelangelo FOTI’s laboratory highlighted that a particular AUBP, tristetraprolin, promotes tumour initiation, but restrains cancer progression.

FÉVRIER 18 2020

Drug Discovery and Development Targeting Wnt Signaling in Cancer

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Yonika LARASATI, Pr. Vladimir KATANAEV laboratory

Résumé: Triple-negative breast cancer is the breast cancer with the worst prognosis. In this cancer, Wnt signaling pathway is dysregulated and finding agents targeting the upper level of this pathway may improve therapeutical approaches. Yonika LARASATI in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Vladimir KATANAEV’s group has found six potential compounds targeting Wnt signaling which might be able to fight triple-negative breast cancer with lower side effects than conventional treatments.

Metabolic parameters in Type 2 diabetic individuals predict cellular circadian clock properties

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Flore SINTUREL, Dr. Charna DIBNER laboratory

Résumé: Day and night alternation influences the physiology of our entire body. Perturbation of these circadian clocks may play a significant role in the metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Flore SINTUREL in collaboration with other researchers from Dr. Charna DIBNER laboratory compares circadian rhythm of human fibroblast cells from diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. Their recent experiments suggest a link between circadian period length and type 2 diabetes severity.

FÉVRIER 11 2020

β1 integrin acetylation regulates cell growth, adhesion and ECM assembly

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Kenza FOUAD, Pr. Bernhard WEHRLE-HALLER laboratory

Résumé: Wound healing is a complex and fragile process. When disrupted, it might lead to an excessive extracellular matrix deposition and pave the way for cancer development. Kenza FOUAD in collaboration with other researchers from Pr. Bernhard WEHRLE-HALLER laboratory investigates the potential role of acetylation in fibroblasts, and how this affects growth, adhesion and extra-cellular matrix synthesis. Their in vitro experiments conducted with new acetylation-site specific tools suggest that the acetylation of extracellular matrix receptors is modulated to influence the extracellular matrix deposition.

Intracellular killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Xènia CRESPO, Pr. Pierre COSSON laboratory

Résumé: Understanding how immune cells kill bacteria is a key issue to develop new strategies for the prevention and treatment of infectious and immune-mediated diseases. Xènia CRESPO in collaboration with the other researchers from Prof. Pierre COSSON laboratory is developing a new live imaging method with a unicellular model called Dictyostelium discoideum. This so-called regrowth test open perspectives to build more accurate models of intracellular bacterial killing and degradation.

FÉVRIER 4 2020

Cell polarity regulation in the one cell C. Elegans embryo

Lieu: Room D60

Intervenant: Ida CALVI, Pr. Monica GOTTA laboratory

Résumé: -

Molecular heterogeneity and therapeutic potential of human skeletal muscle stem cells

Lieu: Room D60

Intervenant: Thomas LAUMONIER, Pr. Didier HANNOUCHE laboratory

Résumé: Skeletal muscle stem cells are essential for muscle regeneration and are therefore considered as a potential stem cell source to treat muscular dystrophies. The recent cellular and molecular experiments conducted by Dr. Thomas LAUMONIER in collaboration with the other researchers from Pr. Didier HANNOUCHE laboratory suggest that a subpopulation of human muscle stem cells adopt a more stem-like state and may constitute an appropriate stem cell source for potential therapeutic applications.

JANVIER 28 2020

HURP: a marker of shrinking kinetochore fibers?

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Cédric CASTROGIOVANNI, Pr. Patrick MERALDI laboratory

Résumé: -

Exploring new concepts of G protein-coupled receptor signaling and trafficking

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Pr. Miriam STOEBER

Résumé: G protein-coupled receptors are a large family of membrane receptors regulating an incredible range of body functions, from sensation to growth to hormone responses. They are targeted by many approved drugs, such as opioid drugs. Withher newly established group Miriam STOEBER is studying the functioning of these receptors. In one of her recent experiments, she developed a new molecular biosensor able to detect the activation of a particular G protein-coupled receptor, the opioid receptor, in living cells.

JANVIER 21 2020

Regulation of calcium fluxes at endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane contact sites

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Christopher HENRY, Pr. Nicolas DEMAUREX laboratory

Résumé: Calcium is an essential element that is involved in many cell signaling pathways. The store operated calcium entry (SOCE) pathway controls important functions ranging from gene expression to regulation of proliferation. Christopher HENRY in collaboration with other researchers from Pr. Nicolas DEMAUREX laboratory investigates in vitro the regulation of calcium fluxes. Their recent experiments suggest that the distance between the cell membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum modulates SOCE pathway.

Activation of quiescent muscle stem cells by serum

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Axel TOLLANCE, Dr. Maud FRIEDEN laboratory

Résumé: Understanding how skeletal muscle is able to regenerate is a key issue to develop new strategies for the treatment of skeletal myopathies. Serum, the liquid component of blood remaining after coagulation, is an essential factor for the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. Axel TOLLANCE in collaboration with the other researchers from Dr. Maud FRIEDEN laboratory is exploring in vitro the action of serum in the activation of reserve muscle stem cells.

JANVIER 14 2020

Day-night rhythm of skeletal muscle lipid and mitochondrial metabolism and its role in insulin resistance in humans

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Pr. SCHRAUWEN, Maastricht (Netherlands)

Résumé: Type 2 diabetes is a serious metabolic disorder which incidence is rising worldwide. As biological clocks regulate many physiological processes, understanding their implication in type 2 diabetes might provide interesting therapeutic avenues. Prof. Patrick SCHRAUWEN from the University of Maastricht investigates the impact of this circadian rhythm on type 2 diabetic patients, with human metabolic studies. His recent experiments on pre-diabetic volunteers allowed him to highlight a loss of the normal rhythm of mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle.

JANVIER 7 2020

Pyrazoles as inhibitors of Wnt signalling and for the use as novel anti-cancer drugs

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Holly SHAW, Pr. Vladimir KATANAEV laboratory

Résumé: Triple-negative breast cancer contributes to 30% to 50% of all deaths linked to breast cancer. In this cancer, Wnt signaling pathway is dysregulated and finding agents targeting this pathway may improve therapeutical approaches. Holly SHAW in collaboration with other researchers from Prof. Vladimir KATANAEV’s group has found a novelclass of Wnt inhibitors which might be able to fight cancer with lower side effects than conventional treatments: pyrazole derivatives. They are now investigating their exact molecular mechanism of action.

Cystic fibrosis airway epithelium susceptibility to Pseudomomas aeruginosa infection

Lieu: Auditorium Paul Boymond, B02.2226

Intervenant: Juliette SIMONIN, Pr. Marc CHANSON laboratory

Résumé: Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease leading to multiple symptoms. Associated respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of mortality. Juliette SIMONIN in collaboration with the other researchers from Prof. Marc CHANSON laboratory is investigating the contribution of the airway surface liquid to protect airways against P. aeruginosa. These experiments highlight the fact that the airway surface liquid contributes to airway epithelium protection, and to integrity of junctional network.