Research

Our research aims to develop quantum technologies for emerging applications in quantum information science. Our work spans applied and fundamental aspects of quantum communication, from QKD prototypes to teleportation, in the lab and in real world networks. We are developing key enabling quantum technologies including photon sources, interfaces and detectors. Underlying this we have activities in quantum metrology to better characterise these emerging quantum technologies and applications as well as exploiting them for sensing and imaging, for example, in biophotonics.


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Quantum Cryptography addresses one of societies most pressing concerns for confidential and authenticated communication. Encryption and authentication can be realised with provable information-theoretic security. However, the fundamental resources of these schemes are random and secret strings of bits, shared between the two distant parties. This can be achieved with quantum key distribution (QKD). The security is based on the laws of quantum physics, in particular the no-cloning theorem which forbids the creation of identical copies of unknown quantum states and the fact that a measurement of an unknown quantum state inevitably disturbs it.
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Single photon detectors are the key components in numerous photonics-related applications such as quantum cryptography, optical time-domain reflectometry, and integrated circuit testing as well as serving diverse applications in metrology, both classical and, more recently, quantum. We are working on several different systems including single photon avalanche photodiodes (SPAD), superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPD) and hybrid devices for both visible and telecom wavelengths.
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Exploring new physics usually requires a new, better way of measuring a particular quantity. Optical measurements are ultimately limited by quantum mechanical effects, such as the uncertainty principle, shot noise or decoherence. However, quantum mechanics also offers new prospects for metrology. Our focus is on applying quantum mechanical tools and techniques to improve the performance of measurement devices and systems.
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Quantum communication is the art of transferring a quantum state between distant locations, either to transmit information, or distribute resources such as entanglement and nonlocality. Our work takes advantage of the close connection between theory and experiments in quantum optics and quantum information science that allow us to study fundamental concepts of Nature at the same time as advancing towards complex quantum networks, device independent quantum processing and a future quantum Internet.
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Quantum Photonics includes the generation, emission, transmission, switching, amplification and in general, covers the engineering and coherent control of quantum systems, i.e. down to the single photon level. It is a key enabling quantum technology for the future. We have wide ranging activities that exploit classical, quantum and nonlinear optics that allow us to produce single-, pair-, and multi-photon sources, with well defined and reproducible characteristics and allow us to coherently control them. This allows us to develop the tools for exploring fundamental aspects of quantum physics, as well as the understanding to engineer quantum photonic technologies.
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We are interested in exploiting quantum technologies, entangled photons and single photon detectors, to explore biological systems. Applications are emerging for sensing and imaging as well as probing molecular dynamics in regimes unattainable with conventional (classical) approaches.