Research / Recherche

 Barneo2.jpg

At the Barneo Ice Station (89°N) on the way to the North Pole in April, 2009

A la station de Barneo sur la banquise (89°N), en route vers le Pôle Nord en avril 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numerical simulations of climate

Martin Beniston has a wide-reaching experience in the numerical simulation of climate processes at the regional scale, investigating both atmospheric processes and future climate trends in a "greenhouse world".

In the 1980s, he developed a finite-difference atmospheric model to study turbulent and cloud processes when working at the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg (MPIMet), and subsequently applied the model to air pollution studies at the Swiss Federal Institute for Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). From the end of the 1990s established a long-standing collaboration with the numerical climate modeling team at the University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM). The Canadian Regional Climate Model (C-RCM) was then used for numerous climate studies. In addition, results from a suite of regional climate models used in particular in the EU PRUDENCE and ENSEMBLES Projects were applied to a range of climate-relevant issues focusing on Europe in general and Switzerland in particular, including:

  • Wind-storm simulations
  • Heat-wave analyses
  • Heavy precipitation
  • Drought
  • Projections of weather extremes in a warming climate

These activities have been widely funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation, Swiss public and private sectors, and European Projects under EU Framework Programs 5, 6, 7 and Horizon-2020.

All these studies (and those described in the following paragraphs) have been published in the international literature and are available in the publications list pages.

 

--> Homepage

--> Top of this page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equations2.png

 A set of partial-differential equations used to solve some elements of atmospheric physics. Background picture: a measurement station on the Arctic Ocean sea ice (April, 2009).

 

Arc-en-Ciel.jpg

Stormy skies over the Lake of Geneva

Morteratsch3.jpg

The Morterarsch Glacier in the Upper Engadine region of Eastern Switzerland, one of the rapidly dwindling elements of the Alpine cryosphere over the past 150 years.

Analyses of climate data and climate impacts studies

The wealth of observational data at the European level in general, and for Switzerland in particular, has enabled many studies to be undertaken on the behavior of climate since the turn of the 20th Century. Among other issues, these studies have aimed at assessing the long-term trends of temperature and precipitation, as well as the frequency and intensity of extreme events such as wind-storms, heatwaves, heavy precipitation, and droughts.

Combining both observational evidence of a changing climate and climate model results for the coming decades of the 21st Century, Martin Beniston and his team have undertaken numerous climate-impacts studies, in particular those pertaining to:

  • Response of river flows to a changing climate (see more details in the "ACQWA" project section)
  • Changing behavior of snow and ice in mountain regions
  • Physical and biological changes in lakes confronted with a warming climate
  • Impacts of changing hydrological resources for the electricity sector
  • Potential increases in damage to infrastructure with a possible enhancement of the severity of mid-latitude wind-storms

 

--> Homepage

--> Top of this page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research highlights: the EU "ACQWA" Project

Future shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns, and changes in the behaviour of snow and ice in many mountain regions will change the quantity, seasonality, and possibly also the quality of water originating in mountains and uplands. As a result, changing water availability will affect both upland and populated lowland areas. Economic sectors such as agriculture, tourism or hydropower may enter into rivalries if water is no longer available in sufficient quantities or at the right time of the year. The challenge is thus to estimate as accurately as possible future changes in order to prepare the way for appropriate adaptation strategies and improved water governance.

The ACQWA Project, initiated and coordinated by Martin Beniston (and administered by Prof. Markus Stoffel) was funded after a competitive bid in 2007 by EU Framework Program 7 (6.5 million Euros for 5 years). The Project involved over 100 scientists in 37 partner institutions in 10 countries in Europe, South America, and Central Asia.

The project’s objectives were to assess the vulnerability of water resources to climatic change in mountain regions such as the European Alps, the Central Chilean Andes, and the mountains of Central Asia (Kyrgyzstan), where declining snow and ice are likely to strongly affect hydrological regimes in a warmer climate. Model results were then used to quantify the environmental, economic and social impacts of changing water resources in order to assess how robust current water governance strategies are and what adaptations may be needed in order to alleviate the most negative impacts of climate change on water resources and water use.

A short summary of the project is available by clicking here, while a more complete report and additional details are available on the project’s website.

In 2010, the TV news channel EURONEWS broadcast a 1o-minute documentary on the ACQWA Project that you can view by clicking here.

--> Homepage

--> Top of this page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lac_Fenetre.jpg

 Alpine lake in the vicinity of the Great St Bernard Pass, Switzerland, in the catchment of the Rhone River, one of the test sites of the ACQWA Project.

 

Aconcagua2.jpg

 Aerial view of the Aconcagua, at close to 7,000 m elevation, dominating the headwaters of the Aconcagua Catchment in Chile, one of the test sites of the ACQWA Project.

planetsolar.ship.jpg

The futuristic looks of the Swiss vessel "Tûranor Planet Solar" (in 2013) and its array of over 500 m2 of solar panels that feed electricity into the batteries located in both catamaran floaters

 

Planetsolar.TowerBridge.jpg

"Tûranor Planet Solar" towards the end of its mission as it passes beneath Tower Bridge in London, early September 2013

 

Click here to view a 5-minute video of the "PlanetSolar DeepWater" expedition in 2013!

Research highlights: the "PlanetSolar DeepWater" Project

The Swiss “MS Tûranor Planet Solar” is the largest solar-powered vessel ever built and is the first solar-powered object that accomplished the first round-the-world tour in 2012 powered only by solar energy. Its exclusive features, in particular a pollution-free environment with no exhaust fumes as on a classical ship, and the possibility to accurately position the vessel, makes this an interesting platform for in situ observations at the ocean-atmosphere interface.

The “PlanetSolar DeepWater” Project that took place in 2013 was led by Martin Beniston for the scientific part and by Dr. Didier Raboud (a member of the Rectorate of the University of Geneva and Head of the University's media services) for the media and public-relations part.

The principal objective of the project was to use the pollution-free features “Planet Solar” to carry out a unique scientific expedition along the Gulf Stream in the North Atlantic, and to contribute to raising awareness about the reality and complexity of climatic change.

The mission in the North Atlantic began in early June, 2013, in Miami, Florida, and tracked the Gulf Stream for over 5,000 km via New York, Boston, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Saint John’s (Newfoundland), London, and finally Paris in September 2013.

The ocean current that transports heat from the Tropics to the Arctic across the Atlantic Ocean is one of the most significant regulators of climate. Satellite imagery and Earth-based observations have reasonably well documented the features of the Gulf Stream, such as the vortices (or eddies) that break away from the main stream of the ocean current, but the interlinked physical, chemical, and biological processes taking place in the main current and the eddies is still a matter of considerable scientific interest. A unique element of the 2013 expedition was the use of a pioneering laser-based instrument to measure the quantity and typology of aerosols released by the ocean into the atmosphere. According to the temperature and salinity characteristics of the ocean water, the main current, and the ocean eddies, it was possible to document accurately the behavior of marine-based aerosols over a trajectory of more than 5,000 km.

Since aerosols play an important role in the modulation of climate, understanding their behavior under the influence of particular water masses can ultimately lead to an improvement in the performance of climate models, by incorporating the influence of aerosols on local and regional climates.

A major publication emerged from this expedition:

Kasparian, J., Hassler, C., Ibelings, B., Berti, N., Bigorre, S., Djambazova, V., Gascon-Diez, E., Guiliani, G., Houlman, R., Kiselev, D., Philipp de Laborie, P., Anh-Dao Le, Magouroux, T., Neri, T., Palomino, D., Pfänder, S., Ray, N., Sousa, G., Staedler, D., Tettamanti, F., Wolf, J.-P., and Beniston, M., 2017: Assessing the dynamics of organic aerosols over the North Atlantic Ocean. Scientific Reports, DOI:10.1038/srep45476

 

--> Homepage

--> Top of this page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

--> Homepage

--> Top of this page

 

 

Conferences: Organization and Attendance

Praha.jpg

Prague, venue of the 2007 EU-ENSEMBLES Project General Assembly Conference

 

Workshop Organization

In addition to his research agenda, Martin Beniston has organized numerous scientific meetings, mostly internationally-oriented, in particular:

  • 1987: The International Conference on Energy and Air Pollution at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland
  • 1992: The International Conference on Mountain Environments in Changing Climates, Davos, Switzerland
  • 1995-2007: The International Wengen Workshops on Global Change Research, co-organized with leading institutions worldwide, focusing on topics such as regional climate modeling, biomass burning, desertification, climate impacts on hydrology, human health, migrations, and many more themes, The meetings took place generally each Fall in Wengen in the Bernese Alps, Switzerland
  • 2008-2013: In the context of the EU "ACQWA" Project, coordinated by Martin Beniston, scientific meetings were held in the context of the annual project General Assembly meetings, in Wengen, Switzerland (2008), Courmayeur, Italy (2009), Dundee, Scotland (2010), Zaragoza, Spain (2011), Riederalp, Switzerland (2012) and Trieste, Italy (2012), and Geneva (2013)
  • 2015-2019: Meetings similar in spirit to the Wengen Workshops mentioned above were co-organized in Riederalp, Switzerland, in the late Winter/early Spring timeframe. These include: Extreme Climate Events (2015), Mountain Cryospheres: From Process Understanding to Impacts and Adaptation (2016), Risks and Hazards in Natural and Urban Environments (2017), Exposure, Vulnerability and Resilience of Human Societies to Climate (2018), and Climate Extremes: New Ideas for Quantifying Changes and Improving Resilience (2019)

 

Workshop Attendance

Martin Beniston has spoken at over 600 meetings in many venues around the World. These include international and national conference, and talks designed for the public as well as economic and decision makers.

Click on this link for a full list of events in which he participated during his career.

 

Singapore.jpg

Futuristic architecture in Singapore, venue of the 2016 International Water Week and Conference

 

 

--> Homepage

--> Top of this page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

 

 

Les simulations numériques du climat

Equations2.png

 

Equations pour décrire une partie de la physique de l'atmosphère. En arrière plan, une station de mesures météorologiques à la base russe de Barneo, sur la banquise à environ 100 km du Pôle Nord (avril 2009).

 

Martin Beniston a acquis une expérience impotante dans la simulation numérique de processus atmosphériques à une échelle géographique régionale. Les modèles de climat servent à mieux comprendre le fonctionnement du système climatique et aussi à établir des projections d'un climat future sous l'influence d'une augmentation des gaz à effet de serre.

Dans les années 1980, il développe un modèle atmosphérique pour l'étude de processus liés à la turbulence et aux nuages, alors qu'il travaille à l'Institut Max-Planck de Météorologie à Hambourg (MPIMet). Par la suite il a étendu ses études numériques à la pollution de l'air lors de ses années passées à l'Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL). Dès le milieu des années 1990, il établit une collaboration à long terme avec l'équipe de modélisation du climat de l'Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). Le modèle climatique canadien à échelle régionale (C-RCM) est utilisé pour de nombreuses applications en Suisse et en Europe. Par ailleurs, les résultats de simulations effectuées par des modèles climatique dans le cadre de projets européens tels que PRUDENCE ou ENSEMBLES sont  appliqués à toute une série d'investigations se focalisant sur l'Europe en général et la Suisse en particulier, notamment:

  • simulations de tempêtes de vent
  • analyse de canicules
  • précipitations extrêmes
  • sécheresses
  • projections d'extrêmes climatiques dans un climat qui se réchauffe

Toutes ces études, et celles qui sont décrites ailleurs dans cette section sur les activités de recherche, ont fait l'objet de publications dans la litérature scientifique internationale. Leur liste se trouve dans les pages dédiées aux publications.

 Ces activités ont été largement financées par le Fonds national suisse de la Recherche scientifique, les secteurs publics et privés suisses, et des projets européens sous l'impulsion des 5e, 6e, 7e Programmes-cadre de recherche et de développement, ainsi que le programme européen "Horizon-2020".

 

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

 

Analyses de données climatiques -  Etudes d'impacts du changement climatique

 _DSC6386.JPG

 Le Glacier de Morteratsch, dans les Grisons (Suisse orientale), qui est emblématique du recul des glaciers alpins depuis plus de 150 ans...

 

La quantité et la qualité de données climatiques en Europe en général, et en Suisse en particulier, a permis d'entreprendre de nombreuses études sur le comportement du climat depuis le début du 20e siècle. L'objectif de ces recherche était d'évaluer les tendances à long terme de températures et de précipitations, ainsi que la fréquence et l'intensité d'évènements climatiques extrêmes, telles que les tempêtes, les canicules, les fortes pluies et les sécheresses.

En combinant à la fois les données d'observations climatiques et les résultats de modèles de simulation climatique pour le 21e siècle, Martin Beniston et son équipe ont entrepris de nombreuses études sur les impacts climatiques, dont par exemple:

  • la réponse de systèmes hydrologiques à un climat qui change (voir en particulier la section sur le projet "ACQWA")
  • le changement du comportement de la neige et de la glace dans les régions de montagne
  • les changements physiques et biologiques dans des lacs soumis au réchauffement du climat
  • l'impact des changements de ressources hydrologiques sur le secteur de l'hydro-électricité
  • l'augmentation potentielle des dégâts à l'infrastructure bâtie suite à un accroissement possible de l'intensité de tempêtes de vent dans un climat futur

 

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

 

Exemple de recherche: le projet européen "ACQWA"

 Aconcagua2.jpg

La plus haute montagne d'Amérique Latine, l'Aconcagua à presque 7'000 m d'altitude, fait partie de l'une des zones d'études du Projet "ACQWA".

 

Les changements probables de régimes de températures et de précipitations dans un climat plus chaud, ainsi que la réaction du manteau neigeux et des glaciers dans de nombreuses régions de montagne du globe, affecteront la quantité, le caractère saisonnier, et la qualité de l'eau de cours d'eau qui prennent leur source dans les massifs montagneux. Ces changements affecteront la disponibilité en eau à la fois dans les régons de montagnes ainsi que dans les régions de plaine. Des secteurs économiques tels que l'agriculture, le tourisme, ou encore l'hydro-électricité, pourraient entrer en conflits d'intérêts à cause d'une ressource en forte diminution ou pas disponible à la bonne période de l'année. Le défi est donc d'évaluer le plus précisemment possible les changements futurs  de la ressource hydrologiques afin de mettre en place des stratégies d'adaptation et améliorer la gouvernance de l'eau.

A l'issue d'un concours international, le projet ACQWA, initié et coordonné par Martin Beniston (et administré par le Prof. Markus Stoffel) est financé en 2007 par le 7e Programme-cadre de l'UE à hauteur de 6,5 millions d'Euros (2008-2014). Le projet a regroupé plus de 100 scientifiques dans 37 institutions partenaires, répartis dans dix pays en Europe, en Amérique du Sud, et en Asie Centrale.

L'objectif principal du projet était d'évaluer la vulnérabilité de la ressource en eau face au changement climatique dans des régions de montagnes telles que les Alpes, les Andes centrales (Chili-Argentine), et les massifs du Kyrgyzstan, où la diminution du volume de neige et de glace perturbe le cycle hydrologique de nombreux fleuves. Les résultats des simulations climatiques ont ensuite servi à évaluer les impacts environnementaux, économiques et sociaux des changements de régimes hydrologiques afin de déterminer la pertinence des politiques publiques de l'eau actuelles, et les stratégies d'adaptations qui seraient nécessaires afin d'atténuer les impacts les plus négatifs sur l'eau et ses usages.

Un bref résumé du projet (en anglais) est disponible en cliquant ici. Un rapport plus complet, ainsi que des informations supplémentaires sur le projet "ACQWA" sont disponibles sur le site web du projet.

En 2010, la chaîne d'informations EURONEWS a diffusé un reportage de 10 minutes sur le projet ACQWA que vous pouvez visualiser en cliquant ici.

 Lac_Fenetre.jpg

Un lac de montagne (Canton du Valais, Suisse) dans l'une des zones d'études du projet ACQWA, faisant face à la partie italienne du massif du Mont-Blanc.

 

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

 

Exemple de recherche: le projet "PlanetSolar DeepWater"


planetsolar.ship.jpg

 L'architecture futuriste du navire suisse "Tûranor Planet Solar", utilisé par nos équipes de l'Université de Genève sur l'Atlantique Nord pendant l'été 2013

 

CLIQUEZ ICI POUR VISIONNER UNE VIDEO DE L'EXPEDITION DE L'UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE EN 2013!

Le navire suisse “MS Tûranor Planet Solar” est le plus grand bateau solaire au monde. En 2012, il est devenu le premier véhicule à avoir accompli un tour du monde avec l'énergie solaire comme unique carburant. L'intérêt d'utiliser le bateau en tant que plateforme de mesures scientifiques à l'interface océan-atmosphère est lié notamment à l'absence de pollution telle que celle émise par les cheminées d'un bateau classique et à la possibilité de positionner le bateau avec précision au contraire d'un voilier, par exemple.

Le projet “PlanetSolar DeepWater” qui s'est déroulé en 2013 a été mené par Martin Beniston pour la partie scientifique et par le Dr Didier Raboud (membre du Rectorat de l'Université de Genève et directeur du Service de presse et de communication) pour les aspects médias et relations publiques. L'objectif principal du projet était de profiter des particularités non-polluantes de "Planet Solar" pour entreprendre une expédition scientifque unique le long du Gulf Stream dans l'Atlantique Nord, et de contribuer à la prise de conscience sur la réalité et la complexité du changement climatique. La mission dans l'Atlantique Nord a démarré début juin 2013 à Miami (Floride), et a suivi le Gulf Stream sur plus de 5'000 km via New York, Boston, Halifax (Nouvelle-Ecosse), Saint-Jean (Terreneuve), Londres et enfin Paris en septembre 2013.

Le courant océanique qui transporte la chaleur depuis les tropiques en direction de l'Arctique à travers l'Océan Atlantique est l'un des régulateurs les plus importants du climat. Les images prises par satellites et les observations terrestres ont permis de bien documenter les caractéristiques du Gulf Stream, tels que les vortex (ou tourbillons géants) qui se détachent du courant principal. Cependant, les processus physiques, chimiques, et biologiques, souvent inter-connectés, qui se manifestent dans le Gulf Stream et dans les vortex sont encore assez méconnus. Un élément phare de l'expédition de 2013 était l'utilisation d'un instrument laser prototype permettant de mesurer la quantité et la typologie des aérosols (micro-particules ou micro-goutelettes) relâchées par l'océan vers l'atmosphère. Selon les caractéristiques de température et de salinité de l'eau, ainsi que son contenu en micro-organismes marins, il a été possible de documenter avec précision le comportement des aérosols d'origine marine le long d'une trajectoire de plus de 5'000 km.

Etant donné le fait que les aérosols sont capables de moduler le climat à des échelles spatiales variables, une meilleure compréhension de leur comportement lié aux caractéristiques de différentes masses d'eau peut à terme permettre une meilleure performance de modèles climatiques par l'incorporation de l'influence des aérosols sur les climats locaux et régionaux.

Une publication dans une revue majeure résume les éléments scientifiques de l'expéditon:

Kasparian, J., Hassler, C., Ibelings, B., Berti, N., Bigorre, S., Djambazova, V., Gascon-Diez, E., Guiliani, G., Houlman, R., Kiselev, D., Philipp de Laborie, P., Anh-Dao Le, Magouroux, T., Neri, T., Palomino, D., Pfänder, S., Ray, N., Sousa, G., Staedler, D., Tettamanti, F., Wolf, J.-P., and Beniston, M., 2017: Assessing the dynamics of organic aerosols over the North Atlantic Ocean. Scientific Reports, DOI:10.1038/srep45476

Cliquer ici pour voir une séquence vidéo de 5 minutes sur l'expédition "PlanetSolar DeepWater" en 2013!

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

 

 

 Planetsolar.TowerBridge.jpg

 

 "Tûranor Planet Solar" passant sous le "Tower Bridge" de Londres peu de temps avant la fin de l'expédition en 2013.

 

 

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

Conférences: Organisation de colloques et participation à des conférences

 Praha.jpg

Prague, site de la conférence de 2007 du projet EU-ENSEMBLES

Organisation de colloques

Outre son agenda de recherche, Martin Beniston a organisé de nombreuses réunions scientifiques internationales, en particulier:

  • 1987: The International Conference on Energy and Air Pollution à l'Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausenne (EPFL), Suisse
  • 1992: The International Conference on Mountain Environments in Changing Climates, Davos, Suisse
  • 1995-2007: les colloques internationaux Wengen Workshops on Global Change Research, co-organisés avec des institutions de recherche reconnues sur le plan mondial. Les colloques se sont penchés sur des thèmes tels que la simulation climatique à l'échelle régionale, les feux de forêts et de brousse (la combustion de la biomasse), la désertification, les impacts climatiques sur l'hydrologie, la santé humaine, les migrations, et d'autres encore. Les conférences se sont tenues chaque année pendant l'automne à Wengen, dans les Alpes bernoises en Suisse.
  • 2008-2013: dans le cadre du projet européen "ACQWA", coordonné par Martin Beniston, des réunions scientiques se sont tenues en marge des assemblées générales annuelles, notamment à Wengen, Suisse (2008), Courmayeur, Italie (2009), Dundee, Ecosse (2010), Saragosse, Espagne (2011), Riederalp, Suisse (2012) et Trieste, Italie (2012), et enfin Genève (2013)
  • 2015-2019: Des réunions semblables aux Colloques de Wengen Workshops mentionnés ci-dessus se sont tenues à Riederalp (canton du Valais, Suisse), vers la fin de l'hiver. Parmi ces colloques, on peut citer: Extreme Climate Events (2015), Mountain Cryospheres: From Process Understanding to Impacts and Adaptation (2016), Risks and Hazards in Natural and Urban Environments (2017), Exposure, Vulnerability and Resilience of Human Societies to Climate (2018), and Climate Extremes: New Ideas for Quantifying Changes and Improving Resilience (2019)

 

Participation à des conférences

Martin Beniston a pris la parole à plus de 600 réunions scientifiques et colloques destinées au grand public et aux responsables économiques et politiques dans différentes parties du monde.

Cliquer ici pour un aperçu des différents événements auxquels il a participé pendant sa carrière.

 Singapore.jpg

 

Une architecture audacieuse à Singapour, où s'est tenue en 2016 la Semaine Internationale et Conférence sur l'Eau

--> Homepage

--> Haut de la page

 

Underline.jpg