JUNIOR
GLOBAL POISSON
WORKSHOP
II

3-6 May 2021



Four-Day Virtual Conference
for Junior Researchers
in Poisson Geometry and Related Fields

Registration is free but mandatory.


Registration Deadline: 2 May 2021


WELCOME MESSAGE
FROM THE ORGANISERS


CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

Monday, 3 May

  • Scientific session
  • Professional Development Session
  • Social Activities

Tuesday, 4 May

  • Scientific Session
  • Networking Session
  • Social Activities

Wednesday, 5 May

  • Colloquium
  • Scientific Session
  • Networking Session
  • Social Activities

Thursday, 6 May

  • Discussion Session
  • Global Poisson Webinar
  • Award Ceremony
  • Social Activities

GMT is the reference time zone during JGPW.
Your web browser's time zone is GMT

DOWNLOAD SCHEDULE


WORKSHOP SPEAKERS

Click on the profile picture to go the personal webpage.

Anna Abasheva

Columbia

PhD Student

Luis Alejandro
Barbosa Torres

USP

Postdoctoral Researcher

Irina Bobrova

HSE

PhD Student

Stephane Geudens

KU Leuven

PhD Student

Jacob Kryczka

LAREMA, Angers

PhD Student

Joseph Palmer

UIUC

Postdoctoral Researcher

Ivan Sechin

Skoltech

PhD Student

Xiudi Tang

Toronto

Postdoctoral Researcher

Fridrich Valach

Imperial College London

Postdoctoral Researcher

Karoline van Gemst

Sheffield

PhD Student

Carlos Augusto
Bassani Varea

USP

Postdoctoral Researcher

Aldo Witte

Utrecht

PhD Student
(talk cancelled)

Carlos
Zapata-Carratala

Edinburgh

Postdoctoral Researcher


ABSTRACTS

Non-algebraicity of hypercomplex nilmanifolds


Anna Abasheva

Columbia University; Higher School of Economics

This is a joint work with Misha Verbitsky, arXiv:2103.05528

A hypercomplex manifold $X$ is a manifold equipped with an action of the quaternion algebra on its tangent bundle satisfying an integrability condition. Every hypercomplex manifold has a whole 2-sphere of complex structures; in this way it makes sense to talk about a generic complex structure $L$ on a $X$. It turns out that if $X$ is a compact hyperkähler manifold then the complex manifold $X_L$ is non-algebraic for a generic complex structure (Fujiki, 87). Furthermore, $X_L$ admits no rational non-trivial morphisms onto an algebraic variety ( = “algebraic dimension of $X_L$ vanishes”). By a later result by Misha Verbitsky (1995) all the subvarieties of $X_L$ for a generic $L$ are trianalytic, namely, they are complex analytic with respect to every complex structure. Consequently, $X_L$ doesn’t contain even-dimensional subvarieties (f.e. curves and divisors).

It might be tempting to conjecture that similar assertions hold for hypercomplex manifolds; this is, however, false in general. Nevertheless, the first assertion turns out to hold for so called hypercomplex nilmanifolds. A nilmanifold is a quotient of a nilpotent Lie group by a lattice. A left-invariant (hyper)complex structure on a Lie group is inherited by the quotient; in this way it makes sense to talk about (hyper)complex nilmanifolds. Complex nilmanifolds are non-Kähler, except for complex tori. Under an additional assumption on a hypercomplex nilmanifold (the existence of an HKT-structure) we are able to prove the assertion about subvarieties. Moreover, we provide a classification of trianalytic subvarieties in this case. My talk will be dedicated to the explanation of these results.

Slides

Equivariant Cohomology Models for Differentiable Stacks


Luis Alejandro Barbosa Torres

University of São Paulo (USP)

We introduce the concept of equivariant cohomology in the smooth manifold case and the notion of differentiable stacks. Then we consider an action of a Lie group on a differentiable stack in the sense of Romagny and consider the stacky quotient associated to this action. Consequently, we construct an atlas that makes these stacky quotient a differentiable stack. Using that the nerve of the associated Lie groupoid of that stack gives its the homotopy type, we provide a Borel model for equivariant cohomology in this context. In order to follow the classical approach for equivariant cohomology, we build a Cartan model for differentiable stacks and we prove that both models compute the same cohomology as the proposed by the Borel model.

Slides (Plenary), Slides (Parallel)

On some structures of the second Painlevé equation and related hierarchies


Irina Bobrova

Higher School of Economics

This talk is divided into two parts. The first part is general: we will discuss what the Painlevé equations are and what structures they have, namely integrability, confluences, Hamiltonian structures, sigma-coordinates and symmetries. In the second part, we will consider some integrable hierarchies associated with the second Painlevé equation, their sigma-coordinates, symmetries, and further generalizations to non-commutative cases.

arXiv:2010.10617, arXiv:2012.11010

Slides

The Poisson saturation of regular submanifolds


Stephane Geudens

KU Leuven

I will talk about a class of submanifolds in Poisson geometry, which are defined in terms of a constant rank condition. Their main feature is the fact that their local saturation is an embedded Poisson submanifold. I will give a normal form for the induced Poisson structure on the local saturation, and discuss some consequences. Time permitting, I will show how these results generalize to the setting of Dirac geometry.

Slides

Local gauge field theory from the perspective of non-linear PDE geometry


Jacob Kryczka

LAREMA, University of Angers

Higher structures and derived geometry have become ubiquitous tools when studying the mathematics of quantum field theory. Specifically, shifted Poisson structures and their quantization have found application in quantum field and string theory with derived symplectic geometry providing a powerful reinterpretation of the AKSZ formalism.

In the most `basic' setting, these notions appear when describing the homotopical space of critical points of an action functional. Rather than start with the critical locus, we would like to study the corresponding space of solutions of the equation of motion and the natural geometric structures it possesses. The upshot of this type of an approach is that we can study non-linear PDEs which are not necessarily of Euler-Lagrange form.

In my talk I will describe a functorial approach to non-linear PDEs in the presence of symmetries. We will pay special attention to describing gauge field theories and the derived covariant phase space, equipped with its canonical shifted symplectic form.

Slides

Hamiltonian $S^1$-spaces, semitoric integrable systems, and hyperbolic singularities


Joseph Palmer

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

A Hamiltonian action of $S^1$ on a symplectic 4-manifold comes with a real valued Hamiltonian function $J$. When we can we find a smooth map $H$ such that $(J,H)$ is an integrable system? Moreover, what can we say about the properties of the resulting system $(J,H)$ in different situations? We explore these questions and how their answers relates to toric integrable systems, semitoric integrable systems, and a class of integrable systems with hyperbolic singularities which generalize semitoric systems. This is joint work with S. Hohloch.

Slides

Quantum R-matrix identities and Interacting Integrable Tops


Ivan Sechin

Skoltech

Integrability of classical integrable systems, for example, multi-particle Calogero–Moser system, is based on some functional identities on rational, trigonometric, or elliptic functions, which ensure the existence of Lax pair and the Poisson commutativity of integrals of motion. It appears that some quantum R-matrices satisfy the matrix analogues of the relations, known as associative Yang–Baxter equation and its degenerations. This fact allows us to use such quantum R-matrices in Lax pairs instead of scalar functions and construct new classical integrable systems.

I will describe the example of the application of quantum R-matrices relations in classical integrability, introducing the system of interacting integrable tops, generalizing both Calogero–Moser systems of particles and Euler tops. I will also show how the resulting integrable structures simultaneously contain the properties of particle and top systems. If time permits, I briefly discuss the quantization of these structures, in the elliptic case it leads to quadratic quantum algebras which generalize both Sklyanin algebra and Felder elliptic quantum group.

Slides

Symplectic excision


Xiudi Tang

University of Toronto

We consider closed subsets of a noncompact symplectic manifold and determine when they can be removed by a symplectomorphism, in which case we say the subsets are symplectically excisable. We prove that, in the case of a ray and more generally, the embedding of the epigraph of a lower semi-continuous function, there is a time-independent Hamiltonian flow that excises it from a noncompact symplectic manifold.

arXiv:2101.03534

Slides

On a generalisation of Lie and Courant algebroids, and its application to exceptional generalised geometry


Fridrich Valach

Imperial College London

I will introduce and discuss the notion of G-algebroids. These objects provide a common generalisation for Lie, Courant, and a special class of Leibniz algebroids used in exceptional generalised geometry (the 3 classes correspond to taking G to be the A, D, E simple groups, respectively). I will present a classification result in the exact case and provide an algebroid formulation for the recently introduced Poisson–Lie U-duality. This is a joint work with M. Bugden, O. Hulik, and D. Waldram.

arXiv:2103.01139

Slides (Plenary), Slides (Parallel)

Frobenius manifolds, mirror symmetry and integrable systems


Karoline van Gemst

University of Sheffield

Frobenius manifolds were introduced by Boris Dubrovin in the early 90’s as a means to describe 2-dimensional topological field theories in a coordinate-free way. Now, however, they arise in seemingly very distant mathematical areas and provide a bridge between them. Examples of such topics are enumerative geometry, singularity theory and integrable systems. In fact, mirror symmetry can be phrased as an isomorphism of Frobenius manifolds.

In this talk I will give a brief overview of what a Frobenius manifold is and how they are useful in the context of mirror symmetry. I will then present recent results obtained together with Andrea Brini. Lastly, I will highlight the connection between Frobenius manifolds and integrable systems, and an application of our mirror theorem in this context.

arXiv:2103.12673

Slides

Invariant generalized complex structures on flag manifolds


Carlos Augusto Bassani Varea

University of São Paulo (USP)

The aim of this talk is to describe the invariant generalized complex structures look on a maximal flag manifold in terms of a fixed root system associated to the complex semisimple Lie algebra determining the flag manifold. This is a joint work with Luiz A. B. San Martin.

Slides

Polynomial multivector fields (cancelled)


Aldo Witte

Utrecht University

We will discuss vector fields on a vector bundle $E \rightarrow M$ which are (homogeneous) polynomial with respect to the scalar multiplication. We will show that the space of such vector fields $X^p(E)_{pol}$ carries a very interesting algebraic structure, which will allow us, among others to describe elements of $X^p(E)_{pol}$ as sections of a very explicit vector bundle over $M$.

This will give us a strategy of studying normal form results in Poisson geometry: first we (abstractly) prove that a given Poisson structure is Poisson diffeomorphic to a polynomial Poisson structure, and then we give an explicit formula for the polynomial Poisson structure using the algebraic structure on $X^p(E)_{pol}$. If time permits we will discuss how to apply this to Lagrangian neighbourhood theorems, and log and elliptic symplectic structures.

Poly-Jacobi Geometry: a serendipitous discovery


Carlos Zapata-Carratala

University of Edinburgh

With motivations in the implementation of physical dimension into geometric mechanics, I will introduce the formalism of dimensioned algebra and the unit-free approach to Jacobi geometry. These will be shown to lead to a natural generalization of Jacobi/Poisson geometry where many constructions, such as products and quotients, become much more natural. Finally, I will present a breadth of structures, tentatively called Poly-Jacobi, which are natural to define within this formalism but don't seem to have been identified in the Poisson literature.

Slides


AWARDS for BEST CONTRIBUTION

Thanks to the generous sponsorships through the Think Ahead programme at the University of Sheffield, we are able to support 4 Awards for Best Contribution for our junior speakers. Each award comes with a prize valued at £150. Two awards will go to PhD students, and two to postdoctoral fellows. Plenary talks will be judged based on the speakers' presentation skills: delivery, engagement, and clarity. The award panel will consist of Francis Bischoff (Oxford), Anastasia Matveeva (Barcelona), and Nikita Nikolaev (Sheffield). A quick award ceremony will take place during the Thursday Social, right after the Global Poisson Webinar.


AWARD PANEL

Francis Bischoff

University of Oxford

Postdoctoral Researcher

Anastasia Matveeva

Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (Barcelona)

PhD Student

Nikita Nikolaev

University of Sheffield

Postdoctoral Researcher


OUR MISSION

To highlight recent advances made by junior researchers in Poisson geometry and related fields of mathematics and mathematical physics.

To create a global online venue for young mathematicians and mathematical physicists which can easily and instantly reach hundreds in the scientific community around the world.

To give our young colleagues the necessary space and platform to advertise their work, their ideas, and their ambition and vision. 

To bring together all generations of our scientific community whilst focusing on the achievements of some of its most junior members

Junior Global Poisson Workshops are recurring events that supplements other global online Poisson events such as the Global Poisson Webinar and the Friday Fish seminar


CONFERENCE FORMAT

PRESENTATION SESSIONS

Every day has one 3-hour Presentation Session featuring four different speakers. Every Presentation Session has two parts: the 2-hour Plenary Session and 1 hour of four Parallel Sessions.

0:00-0:25
PLENARY TALK 1
speaker 1
0:25-0:30 BREAK
0:30-0:55
PLENARY TALK 2
speaker 2
0:55-1:00 BREAK
1:00-1:25
PLENARY TALK 3
speaker 3
1:25-1:30 BREAK
1:30-1:55
PLENARY TALK 4
speaker 4
1:55-2:05 BREAK
2:05-2:30
PARALLEL TALK 1
speaker 1

PARALLEL TALK 2
speaker 2

PARALLEL TALK 3
speaker 3

PARALLEL TALK 4
speaker 4
2:30-3:00
PARALLEL DISCUSSION 1
speaker 1

PARALLEL DISCUSSION 2
speaker 2

PARALLEL DISCUSSION 3
speaker 3

PARALLEL DISCUSSION 4
speaker 4

PLENARY TALKS (25min)

Each Plenary Session is a block of four 25-minute presentations (Plenary Talks) + 5-minute Breaks between talks, featuring four different speakers. These are formal presentations with strict time limits and no interruptions: questions can only be asked in chat, and participants are encouraged to postpone any discussion to Discussion Time. Plenary Talks will be recorded and broadcast live on YouTube, where they will remain as a public resource.

PARALLEL TALKS (25min)

Following a Plenary Session, the four speakers are divided into four Parallel Sessions, which occur simultaneously, where each speaker gives another 25-minute presentation (Parallel Talk) supplementing their Plenary Talk. Parallel Talks are meant to be informal, working-seminar style presentations, and participants are encouraged to engage with the speaker by asking questions and making remarks. Parallel Talks are not recorded and not broadcast.

PARALLEL DISCUSSIONS (30min)

After the Parallel Talk, the speaker hosts (with the help of a moderator) a 30-minute Parallel Discussion Time in the same virtual room. Participants are invited to circulate amongst the different virtual rooms. Parallel Discussions are not recorded and not broadcast.

COLLOQUIUM

There will be a 1-hour Colloquium Talk by Marta Mazzocco.

A Lecture on Quantisation

In this lecture I will discuss some elementary ideas related to quantisation leading to finding the famous KZ equation by quantising co-adjoint orbits in a very simple and explicit example.
Slides, Side Slide

Marta Mazzocco

University of Birmingham

Professor of Mathematics

 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

There will be a special 30-minute presentation by Geoffrey Scott.

Geoffrey Scott

Geoffrey is a former mathematics researcher who specialised in symplectic geometry, toric geometry, and Poisson geometry. Since 2018, he has been a Senior Machine Learning Software Engineer at Google.

TOPIC-BASED DISCUSSION

There will be a 45 minute discussion session,
chaired by Anton Alekseev, on the following topic:

Poisson and quasi-Poisson structures
on moduli spaces of connections

Anton Alekseev

University of Geneva

Professor of Mathematics

The purpose of a topic-based discussion session is to discuss some open problems, questions, and vision in a subtopic of Poisson geometry with junior researchers being the target audience. The main goal is to make the discussion informal and friendly, and to formulate some open problems in a simple way that young researchers can understand and get excited about.

NETWORKING SESSIONS

There will two 1-hour long networking sessions, in the style of Academic Speed-Dating:

  1. You come prepared to describe your research in approximately 3 minutes.
  2. We form random groups of 3 people, sorted into Zoom Breakout Rooms.
  3. The first person in a group describes their research in 3 minutes plus 3 minutes for a short Q&A session. After 7 minutes (including a minute to absorb any delays), it is the second person’s turn to do the same. After 14 minutes, it is the third person's turn to do the same.
  4. The organisers will broadcast in Zoom a reminder message every ~6.5 minutes to help you keep track of the time.
  5. After 20 minutes, we form new groups of 3 (randomly reshuffled into new Zoom Breakout Rooms) and start again.
  6. Each such Networking Session is followed by a Social Time block in Spatial Chat, which the participants may want to use to continue the conversation.

VIRTUAL COFFEE & TEA

There will be virtual coffee and tea breaks: participants will meet via Zoom and SpatialChat in small groups on a drop-in basis using our Slack channel. Please, install Slack and authorise Zoom as explained in the Conference Package.

  SOCIAL TIME

There will also be time blocks reserved for meals, and participants will be encouraged to get together in small groups over Zoom or SpatialChat.
Activities include:

Random Chats
Pictionary
Game "Questions Only"
GIF and Meme Challenge
Cards Against Humanity
Mario Kart
Cocktail Party
Scavenger Hunt
Codenames
Coup
Mafia

Consult your Conference Package for more information.

     


TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS

We will use the following online platforms during the workshop. In order to get the most out of this workshop, both mathematically and socially, we strongly encourage all participants to create (free!) accounts with Zoom and Slack, and install the Zoom Desktop Client and the Slack Desktop Client.

Click icons to be taken to download pages.

Slack

Used for communication during the workshop, including announcements, chat, maths discussions, and social aspects.

Free account needed for social activities
Desktop app strongly recommended

Zoom

Used for video conferencing. All talks and meetings will occur using this platform.

Free account strongly recommended
Desktop app strongly recommended

YouTube

Used for livecasts of plenary talks.

No installation required.

SpatialChat

Used for virtual coffee, tea time, and other socials.

No installation required.
Runs in your browser


CODE OF CONDUCT

TLDR: just be kind and respectful to other participants

We at Junior Global Poisson are committed to providing a professional, friendly, and welcoming environment for all participants. We expect all participants and speakers to help ensure a safe and positive experience for everyone. Unacceptable behaviour will not be tolerated during any portion of our event, including social activities.

UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR

Unacceptable behaviour includes but is not limited to:

  • Intimidating, harassing, abusive, discriminatory, derogatory or demeaning speech or actions
  • Harmful or prejudicial verbal or written comments or visual images related to gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, disability or other personal characteristics
  • Inappropriate use of nudity and/or sexual images
  • Real or implied threat of professional or financial damage or harm
  • Inappropriate disruption of meetings or events

HOW TO REPORT

Report harassment and disruptive behaviour to the organisers either through private messages on Slack or by email. If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact us immediately. Any such communication with us will remain confidential.

CONSEQUENCES

Consequences of misconduct may include immediate removal from our event without warning and restrictions from future Junior Global Poisson Workshops.


ORGANISING COMMITTEE

Lennart Döppenschmitt

University of Toronto

PhD Student

Ilia Gayur

University of Birmingham

PhD Student

Anastasia Matveeva

Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (Barcelona)

PhD Student

Nikita Nikolaev

University of Sheffield

Postdoctoral Researcher


CONTACT US


OUR PARTNERS & SPONSORS

website created and maintained by Nikita Nikolaev